Cutting Food Waste Could Save $300 Billion And Feed Hungry


Reducing consumer food waste could save the global economy up to $300 billion annually by 2030 as one third of all food produced worldwide ends up being discarded, a research group said on Thursday.

WIH Resource Group

Globally, the food wasted by consumers is worth $400 billion a year, and this could jump to $600 billion in the next decade, as the profligate middle class expands in developing countries, the group said.

Cutting the amount of food consumers discard by between 20 and 50 percent could save between $120 and $300 billion yearly by 2030, said the report for the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, an international group chaired by former Mexican President Felipe Calderon.

Food waste in developing countries is due mainly to inadequate refrigeration equipment and poor transport links to markets and processing plants.

“Less food waste means greater efficiency, more productivity, and direct savings for consumers,” Helen Mountford, Global Program Director for the New Climate Economy, a Global Commission project, said in a statement.

“It also means more food available to feed the estimated 805 million that go to bed hungry each day.”

The UK-based Waste and Resources Action Program (WRAP), which produced the report for the Global Commission, is in a partnership with U.N. agencies including the Food and Agriculture Organization to give consumers tools for preventing waste.

In the United Kingdom, a program to improve efficiency – the Love Food Hate Waste campaign – helped households reduce food waste by 21 percent between 2007 and 2012, saving a total of 13 billion pounds ($20.1 billion), the WRAP report said.

In developing countries, about 25 percent of food waste could be eliminated with better refrigeration equipment, WRAP said.

Consumers are responsible for the majority of discarded food in developed countries, often as a result of buying too much at the grocery store or cooking too much, while most of the developing world’s waste happens before food reaches consumers.

Along with improving economic efficiency, reducing waste has big implications for the environment.

An estimated 7 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, the equivalent of 3.3 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide, are due to wasted food, the report said.

SOURCES: Huffington Post – Reporting By Chris Arsenault; Editing by Tim Pearce

Republished by: WIH Resource Group, Inc.

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Case Study: City Mulls Fueling Buses, Garbage Trucks with Landfill Gas by WIH Resource Group


Gas from Fargo’s landfill is already used to generate power and heat, but there’s enough left to fuel the city’s buses and garbage trucks as well.

By removing moisture and impurities, the landfill gas can be converted to natural gas suitable for use in specially equipped vehicles. That’s a good thing because fuel is one of the highest costs of operation for city vehicles. City buses, garbage trucks and police cruisers use an estimated 1,118 gallons a day or 407,900 gallons a year. City staff is mulling over the idea of converting part of the fleet to natural gas, especially residential garbage trucks, which get terrible mileage due to stop-and-go driving.

How much gas is in the landfill?

  • Total emissions is estimated at: 1,300 standard cubic feet per minute.
  • The city uses or sells: 900 scfm.
  • Untapped gas: 400 scfm.
  • How much?: Since the 1,300 scfm is an estimate, the city would likely invest in equipment to treat 100 scfm to start with. That can be converted to enough natural gas to replace 500 gallons of gasoline or 440 gallons of diesel a day.

HOW MUCH fuel does the city fleet use daily?

  • 48 buses use 673 gallons
  • 24 garbage trucks use 247.1 gallons
  • 43 police cruisers use 197.4 gallons
  • TOTAL: 1,118 gallons per day

How much does clean fuel cost?

All-in option

Phased-in option

  • $1.3 million to refine landfill gas for generator to start with. Fueling stations and other equipment may follow
  • $40,000 a year to operate
  • 1 year to break even on capital investment

Landfill gas is going to the generator now but it’s not refined enough and leaves a residue that requires annual cleanup. Refined gas will eliminate this cost.

What’s next?

City staff plan to go with the phased-in option and will issue a zero-interest bond to raise funds. The City Commission still has to OK any spending. As other funds become available, possibly federal grants, investments in natural-gas vehicles would follow.

FROM GARBAGE TO FUEL

City of Sacramento Refuse Trucks are already operating on RNG fuels

As garbage decomposes, it releases methane, CO2, water vapor and other gases that make it stink.

Gas extraction wells tap into gas deep inside a garbage mound and pipe it away.

Before it can be used, the gas is refined so it’s mostly methane, the combustible component of natural gas. Some CO2 and other gases are captured in filters and discarded.

Compressors squeeze the refined gas into a smaller volume to make refueling faster.

Besides saving money, natural gas burns cleaner than diesel or gasoline, which means less greenhouse gas and pollutants.

But there’s the added cost of natural-gas vehicles, new fueling stations and garage modifications so leaked gas doesn’t cause a fire. Also, landfill-gas emissions may vary day to day, so purchased natural gas will be needed as backup.

BioCNG / RNG fueling station located at a landfill.

SOURCES: Terry Ludlum, Fargo solid waste director; City OF Fargo; EPA

Republished by: WIH Resource Group, Inc.

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WIH Resource Group’s Diversified Client-Specific Services

  • Waste Management Consulting
  • Recycling Programs Optimization
  • Alternative Fuels for Truck Fleets & Landfills / BioCNG
  • Research & Polling – Customer Satisfaction Surveys
  • Landfill Operations Consulting
  • Business and Assets Appraisals & Valuations
  • Collection, Processing, Transfer & Disposal Procurement
  • M&A Due Diligence
  • Waste to Energy & New Technology Evaluation Environmental Services
  • Expert Testimony/Litigation Support
  • Facility Planning & Design
  • Finance and Economic Analysis
  • Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures
  • Operations & Performance Assessment (OPAs)
  • Planning – Solid Waste, Recycling and Program
  • Program Management & Capital Project Planning
  • Rates, Financial Analyses & Appraisals
  • Rates and Regulatory Support
  • Recycling Program Design
  • Renewables / Clean Energy Technology

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Electronic Waste Recycling Kiosks Continue to Catch On – WIH Resource Group


Bellevue, Wash.-based Outerwall Inc., through its 1,890 kiosks in 42 states, ecoATM is outpacing its online competitors—think Gazelle and uSell—and its own previous collection rate by two months. It happened earlier this month when the company surpassed the 4 million mark in terms of the number cell phones, tablets, MP3 players and other electronic devices collected at its growing network of ecoATM kiosks.

Equally impressive is that the last time the company clinked glasses was just six months earlier in September for surpassing the 3 million mark with its automated device recycling kiosks, which rescue idle devices through a consumer friendly, cash-on-the-spot model at kiosks located in groceries, malls and big-box stores around the nation.

“ecoATM is safe, fast and convenient way for consumers to go and recycle their e-waste,” says Randy Erman, director of product marketing at ecoATM, which was bought in 2014 by Outerwall and joined the automated family of Redbox and Coinstar. The company also experienced exponential growth in its collection capability by adding more than 1,000 kiosks last year. Texas has the most ecoATM kiosks, followed by Ohio, then California.

“We’ve basically made a mousetrap that incentivizes people to go into their junk drawers and find those old idle devices and bring them to one of our kiosks for instant cash,” he says.

Kate Pearce, head of mobility research and senior strategist at Bandera, Texas-based Compass Intelligence, says smartphones are driving the buyback industry with carriers and re-commerce sectors populated by companies like ecoATM.

“The overarching theme here is extending the device lifecycle for a smartphone is good for the bottom line,” she says, adding that 33 percent of mobile users upgrade their phones annually. “When we talk to end users having an incentive of cash is a big driver and there is a small percentage of people who also have a green mindset and value sustainability.”

Pearce expects that by the end of 2015 there will be nearly 425 million idle or inactive mobile devices in the U.S., and of those, only about 100 million will be recycled.

What makes ecoATM unique is that it accepts phones of all shapes, sizes, colors, ages and conditions, without any of the haggling and awkwardness that could accompany a face-to-face transaction with a human, he says. “We have a catalogue of every single phone that we have ever collected and we have over 5,500 devices in that catalog going all the way back to the old satellite phones and the old text pagers,” Erman says. “Any and all of those devices will get a quote. Our customers are going to walk away with … the knowledge that they have recycled their device in an environmentally sound way.”

Depending on the make, model and condition, consumers can get up to $400 for devices. Newer iPhones and Samsung devices in great condition fetch a higher dollar value than an MP3 player that is a few years old, for example.

Erman says ecoATM uses patented, advanced machine vision, electronic diagnostics and artificial intelligence to evaluate electronics. Cameras capture each customer’s image and live operators verify that the image captured matches the image on the customer’s driver’s license.

Armored trucks collect the phones, just like with normal ATMs. All the devices come back to San Diego where they are processed and sorted. The company is able to find a second life for the majority of the devices it collects. For the remaining devices, ecoATM partners with certified e-waste reclamation facilities to ensure those materials are responsibly reused and recycled.

“We are an R2 certified recycler and what that means is that we are accountable for the phones after we purchase them and make sure that they’re either refurbished or torn down in an environmental way,” Erman says. “We work with a set of buyers to ensure that the precious materials are extracted so they can be reused and that phones that are in good enough shape can be repaired and refurbished. When they are refurbished, they are resold into the channel and that obviously has the biggest bang for the buck environmental wise.”

Source: WIH Resource Group & Waste 360

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For more information, Visit our website by CLICKING HERE and contact us today to see how we can best serve you by phone at 480.241.9994 or by e-mail at admin@wihrg.com

WIH Resource Group’s Diversified Client-Specific Services

Waste Management Consulting
Recycling Programs Optimization
Alternative Fuels for Truck Fleets
Research & Polling – Customer Satisfaction Surveys
Landfill Operations Consulting
Business and Assets Appraisals & Valuations
Collection, Processing, Transfer & Disposal Procurement
M&A Due Diligence
Waste to Energy & New Technology Evaluation Environmental Services
Expert Testimony/Litigation Support
Facility Planning & Design
Finance and Economic Analysis
Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures
Operations & Performance Assessment (OPAs)
Planning – Solid Waste, Recycling and Program
Program Management & Capital Project Planning
Rates, Financial Analyses & Appraisals
Rates and Regulatory Support
Recycling Program Design
Renewables / Clean Energy Technology

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Collect Waste Without Wasting Money


Are You Throwing Money Away with Your Trash?

WIH Resource Group’s Strategic Partner, Enevo, has created ONe which is a comprehensive logistics technology solution that saves time,money and the environment. It uses wireless sensors to measure and forecast the fill-level of waste & recycling containers and generates smart collection plans using the most efficient schedules and routes. The solution provides up to 50% in direct cost savings.

Enevo ONe is a complete waste monitoring solution that brings up to 50% savings in waste collection costs. Works with any type of container and any type of waste mixed, glass, bio, metals or fluids such as oils and waste water etc.

Enevo ONe is a comprehensive logistics solution that saves time, money and the environment. It uses wireless sensors to measure and forecast the fill-level of waste containers and generates smart collection plans using the most efficient schedules and routes. The solution provides up to 50% in direct cost savings.

Smarter Planning

Until now collecting waste has been done using static routes and schedules where containers are collected every day or every week regardless if they are full or not. Enevo ONe changes all this by using smart wireless sensors to gather fill-level data from waste containers. The service then automatically generates schedules and optimized routes which take into account an extensive set of parameters (future fill-level projections, truck availability, traffic information, road restrictions etc.). New schedules and routes are planned not only looking at the current situation, but considering the future outlook as well.

Easy-to-use Mobile Service

A rich historic backlog of all the analysis results, predictions and reports can be accessed using our easy-to-use web service. Our mobile service on cellular tablets help guide your drivers along optimal routes and enable them to report problems directly via the tablet. The mobile service also enables management of all site configuration.

How does it work?

  • Fill level measurement

    Small battery powered wireless sensors monitor each container’s fill level in real time. The sensors are firmly attached and hidden away out of sight inside the container. Waste monitoring works with any type of container and any type of waste (mixed, paper, glass, bio, metals and fluids such as oils and waste water etc.).

  • Analysis and modeling

    The data from each container are sent over wireless cellular networks to the Enevo servers for analysis and immediately displayed when you log on to the Enevo ONe web site.

    • Real time fill level status
    • Alerts for abnormal events (such as high temperature and movement)
    • Predicted fill-up dates
    • Statistics
    • Planning tools
  • Forward to route planning

    You can automatically provide a list of containers, schedules and routes to your drivers through your existing fleet management system. We offer an easy-to-use API for integrating information from the Enevo ONe servers directly into most ERP and fleet management systems available.

Increased Efficiency

Collection based on Enevo’s smart plans significantly reduces costs, emissions, road wear, vehicle wear, noise pollution and work hours. Enevo ONe provides you up to 50% in direct cost savings in waste logistics. And that’s not all. Reducing the amount of overfull containers means less litter and happier customers! Enevo ONe provides a significant increase in efficiency across the whole value chain.

Easy-to-use Web Service

All real-time measurements and forecasts can be accessed through our easy-to-use web service. The web service alerts you if something unexpected happens i.e. a container is only partially collected or a sudden and extreme change in temperature occurs. The web service also shows you how much you have saved thanks to Enevo ONe.

Try Now!!

Whether you are a small organization, private garbage company, large waste management corporation, government agency, small waste generator or large company with lots of locations, we can offer you a flexible service agreement that fits your needs. Most of our customers start out with a pilot trial to see how the service works. As they start saving they rapidly expand the service across more and more containers.

The great thing about Enevo ONe is that it requires no upfront investments, you only pay a fixed monthly rate per sensor. The fixed monthly rate includes the device and warranty, all data transmissions, access to real time measurements, forecasts, collections lists and alerts via our web service. Not included in the monthly rate are shipping and installation of the sensors. Click here to fill out the form on our website via the link below and we’ll get back to you within 24 hours.

Source: WIH Resource Group

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Contact WIH Resource Group
For more information, Visit our website by CLICKING HERE and contact us today to see how we can best serve you by phone at 480.241.9994 or by e-mail at admin@wihrg.com

WIH Resource Group’s Diversified Client-Specific Services

  • Waste Management Consulting
  • Recycling Programs Optimization
  • Alternative Fuels for Truck Fleets
  • Research & Polling – Customer Satisfaction Surveys
  • Landfill Operations Consulting
  • Business and Assets Appraisals & Valuations
  • Collection, Processing, Transfer & Disposal Procurement
  • M&A Due Diligence
  • Waste to Energy & New Technology Evaluation Environmental Services
  • Expert Testimony/Litigation Support
  • Facility Planning & Design
  • Finance and Economic Analysis
  • Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures
  • Operations & Performance Assessment (OPAs)
  • Planning – Solid Waste, Recycling and Program
  • Program Management & Capital Project Planning
  • Rates, Financial Analyses & Appraisals
  • Rates and Regulatory Support
  • Recycling Program Design
  • Renewables / Clean Energy Technology

(Click here to request more information about these services and / or WIH RESOURCE GROUP)

Biomass Energy – Clean Green Renewable Energy


Biomass is currently one of the latest sources of renewable energy. Together with solar energy and wind power it makes a convincing argument for not using fossil fuels anymore and rather reverting to natural processes to obtain the energy / power that we need. Biomass consists of plant matter that is specifically grown for its ability to generate heat or electricity. Mostly this would mean that Biomass consists of dead plant matter, but plants that are still alive can also generate heat and are therefore also included in the term Biomass.

In order to produce the heat or electricity, the biomass needs to be directly incinerated and fed fuel to keep it burning. This means that biodegradable waste can therefore also be included if it is able to burn and generate heat or electricity. Unfortunately fossil fuels also fall in this category as they are traditionally used to burn in order to generate electricity.

Biomass Sources

The main purpose of investigating biomass energy is to find sustainable, renewable energy in order to eliminate the usage of fossil fuels for the purpose of generating electricity. In the following sections we will explore what biomass energy is, how it works, its sources and it potential. It is always important to make decisions such as these based on facts rather than emotional arguments.

What is Biomass?

When looking at biomass, it is important to remember that biomass consists mainly or dead or even living biological matter. In the context of biomass energy this biological matter is usually plant-based.  It is carbon based and consists of molecules of hydrogen (as well as small amounts of oxygen), nitrogen and various other smaller molecules of other chemicals. Although biomass is generally plant-based, animal matter can also be included for the benefit of the chemical molecules that it can contribute.

Why use Biomass?

One of the biggest advantages of using biomass is the fact that it is a renewable energy source. Making use of biomass energy means that the carbon emissions usually associated with burning fossil fuels are drastically reducing, thereby diminishing the carbon “footprint” left behind. This also means that it can contribute to reducing the so-called greenhouse effect, as well as the production of the so-called greenhouse gasses. All of this in turn helps to prevent and minimise global warming.

Biomass Energy

When using biomass for energy purposes, the carbon produced when burning is turned into carbon dioxide when it combines with the oxygen around it. When emitted into the air, the carbon monoxide is ‘inhaled’ by living plant matter. This, in turn, then results in oxygen being released into the atmosphere, reducing the carbon production that the burning of fossil fuels causes. This means that biomass makes more biological and environmental sense when thinking about  sustainable and renewable energy.

Types of Biomass

Scientists recognize four types of biomass:

  • Wood and agricultural products: This consists of so-called ‘home-grown’ products such as wood logs and chips etc. It is important to note that almost any biological matter can produce biomass energy. Agricultural biomass come from waste products such as fruit pits, corn cobs etc.
  • Solid waste: This is everyday waste / ‘garbage’ that can be used to produce energy. It is easily burnt and many plants are already using this method of generating energy.
  • Landfill gas: This is methane gas that is produced during the decaying and rotting process of biological matter. Landfills are artificial environments for these processes to take place, but are just as effective in generating gas that can compete successfully with the so-called ‘natural gasses’.
  • Alcohol fuels: Liquid fuels such as ethanol and methanol are produced using biological matter such as wheat, corn and potatoes. Once again, this is done during the decaying and fermentation processes.

Biomass Energy Types

Sources of Biomass

There are 5 distinct sources of biomass: Garbage, Wood, Waste, Landfill gases and Alcohol fuels. The biggest source of biomass currently is garbage. The day-to-day waste of households hold the biggest potential for biomass energy as it is already habit to incinerate garbage. Wood comes in at second place with the so-called ‘black liquor’ its biggest contributor. Black liquor is the waste product of the pulping process.

Hot on its heels is waste with it main contributors being municipal solid waste (MSW), manufacturing waste and landfill gas. In the last place are the liquid fuels such as ethanol and methanol which are the result of the fermentation of certain plant types such as corn and sugarcane. Together these sources of biomass have the potential to produce significant amounts of energy that could successfully replace the use of fossil fuels such as coal as a source of energy.

How Biomass energy works?

The process of producing biomass energy starts with the process of photosynthesis in plants. When plants absorb sunlight, the process starts with breaking down the components of sun, air and water into products that the plant uses to grow and thrive. One waste product of the process is oxygen which the plant releases into the air. This is why plants are so important as they “clean” the air of carbon dioxide and release oxygen back into the air.

The next step comes when the plant dies and becomes a waste product. As a waste product plant matter (as well as animal waste) can be collected and burned to generate energy. Because these products are all completely natural, the waste product from the incineration process is carbon dioxide which can easily be absorbed by other, living plants. The carbon emissions are greatly reduced and in many cases not even produced.

Potential for Biomass Energy

Studies by the United States of America show that the use of biomass energy can increase sharply over the next 20 – 30 years. They are already producing 1.2 percent of their total energy needs through the use of biomass energy. It is also predicted that four percent of their transportation energy needs (fuel) can be produced in 2010 with an expectation of up to 20 percent in 2030.

The Department of Energy also believes that biomass energy can be producing up to 14 percent of the USA’s energy consumption by 2030. The potential for biomass energy is huge and is making significant inroads in proving to be the most economic solution to the quest for renewable and sustainable energy sources.

Biomass Energy Potential

Converting Biomass to Energy

In order to convert biomass into energy, scientists and energy plants can use 1 of 3 conversion methods:

  • Thermochemical conversion takes place when plant matter is heated but not burned. The heating process helps the plant matter to break down into its natural gasses, liquids and solids. These are then processed to become the energy producing fuel such as methanol and alcohol that is required. The gasses are collected to help fuel the turbines that generate energy.
  • Biochemical conversion is when bacteria etc. is used to break down the plant matter. It makes use of the fermentation process to break plant matter down into solids, gasses and fluids. Once these have been achieved, they are processed and turned into energy generating fuel.
  • Chemical conversion is the process that converts oils (like canola oil) into useful fuels – even petrol and diesel for trucks. Algae has also been known to produce the so-called ‘biodiesel’ for trucks and is acknowledged as a better source than the cooking oil from restaurants.

Biomass Energy Converting
Click here to view full-size image

Biomass Energy Pros and Cons

As with any fuel, there are many pros and cons attached to it.

On the pro side, the obvious benefit is that the biomass fuel is sustainable and renewable. Although they are as effective as fossil fuels, they don’t cause much pollution. Using the garbage that would normally go into a landfill helps to reduce the pollution to the environment. From a political point of view, the use of biomass energy reduces countries’ need to depend on foreign countries for their oil supply.

The cons of biomass energy aren’t immediately visible. The first concern is that biomass energy does release greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. However, the amount is considerably less than that released by fossil fuels. There are special cleaning requirements for a biomass energy plant. There is also the question of how much it costs to erect a biomass energy plant compared to the cost of a fossil fuel energy plant.

Although there are also cons to the use of biomass energy, it is clear that it is still a more sensible approach to the constant threat of global warming. It may be a little too late to repair the damage already done, but it is still possible to overlook the “inconveniences” of biomass energy in order to prevent future damage and disaster.

Biomass Energy Finance

Biomass energy is still a controversial topic in many governments. There is clear competition between the supporters of fossil fuel energy and biomass energy. For this reason governments are wary of offering their support to biomass energy initiatives too quickly. In a domino effect, private investment is tied to the government’s policies on biomass energy and can therefore not be tapped into easily.

Earlier this year the UK government has relented and offered their support for biomass energy pioneers, offering to finance both the non-fuel as well as the fuel aspects of building  plants. This unlocks the doors for private investors into the industry. There is an biomass energy estimated £13 billion in private investment money that has been waiting for the government to change its policy on biomass energy.

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Source: Clean Green Renewable Energy and WIH Resource Group, Inc. (WIH)

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Clean Green Renewable Energy

ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP
WIH Resource Group is a global leader and provider of comprehensive waste management, recycling, transportation/logistical and business solutions, specializing in, among other services, waste management operational performance assessments, transportation / logistics, alternative fuels use, solid waste planning, waste and recycling market studies, business development, business valuations, due diligence and Mergers and Acquistions (M&A) transactional support and environmental services.

WIH Resource Group’s experience includes the oversight of operations, maintenance, finance, human resources, business development, sales, safety and environmental compliance while maintaining responsibility for multi-million dollar publicly and privately held assets including: a variety of collection operations, Sub-title D and hazardous and Class II landfills, transfer stations, intermodal facilities, recycling centers, buyback centers, material recovery facilities, vehicle and container maintenance operations, call centers and payment processing operations.
Based in Phoenix, Arizona, the company serves both private companies and public sector Agency clients throughout North America and internationally.  To learn more about WIH Resource Group, Inc. visit http://www.wihrg.com .

For Additional information on WIH Resource Group, Inc. contact:
Bob Wallace, Principal & VP of Client Solutions
WIH Resource Group – Waste Management, Recycling and Logistical Solutions
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ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP

WIH Resource Group is a global leader and provider of comprehensive waste management, recycling, transportation/logistical and business solutions, specializing in, among other services, waste management operational performance assessments, transportation / logistics, alternative fuel use, solid waste planning, waste and recycling market studies, business development and environmental services.  Based in Phoenix, the company serves both private and public sector clients throughout North America and globally.  Our customers include both public agencies and private sector businesses customers throughout North America. To learn more visit http://www.wihrg.com

About the WIH Resource Group’s Principal Bob Wallace, Principal and Vice President of Client Solutions, WIH Resource Group, Inc. (WIH) and Waste Savings, Inc. (WSI), former Boardmember SWANA ~ State of Arizona Chapter (Solid Waste Association of North America), APWA (American Public Works) ~ National Solid Waste Rate Setting Advisory Committee and Member of WASTEC (Waste Equipment Technology Association) NSWMA ~ Phoenix, Arizona USA. (bwallace@wihresourcegroup.com).

WIH Resource Group’s White Paper on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fuel Use in Refuse Collection Vehicles Industry is Available for Purchasing:   The entire 65-plus page report and Appendices: $299.00 US Funds – Visa and Mastercard Accepted.

Order Your Copy today!

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San Diego Won’t Sell It’s Miramar Landfill via WIH Resource Group, Inc.


San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders is abandoning a potential sale of the Miramar Landfill — a key piece of his fiscal recovery plan — after three private companies withdrew from the bidding process without making an offer.

Instead the mayor said he will move forward with possibly outsourcing the landfill’s operations through managed competition, which allows private firms to compete against city workers for jobs. That option will likely result in far less taxpayer savings than a sale because the city won’t be able to charge the operator a franchise fee of as much as $10 million annually.

The decision ends a seven-month period in which the three firms — Allied Waste Services, Texas Disposal Systems and Waste Management — researched the landfill and negotiated with city officials over various details. In the end, none were willing to submit a formal offer.

“We still believe that selling the landfill was the best option for the city,” Sanders said in a statement. “At the beginning of this process, there was a lot of interest and enthusiasm. But at the end of the day, all of the bidders preferred to run the landfill instead of buy it.”

San Diego faces a $56.7 million budget deficit for the fiscal year that begins July 1 and leaders are exploring a wide range of options to increase revenue or slash expenses. Soliciting bids to take over operations at Miramar Landfill is one of the most frequently mentioned for saving taxpayer money and city leaders even attached it to a campaign to increase the city’s sales tax, which voters roundly rejected in November.

But the potential sale appears to have been doomed by the landfill’s complicated ownership structure and an unwillingness by the private companies to shoulder the financial risk of unknown environmental liabilities.

The city has operated Miramar Landfill since 1959 when it signed a $500-a-year lease deal with the military, which owns the property. The lease, which extends through 2045, changed several times through the years, notably expanding the site from 450 acres to the existing 1,400-acre plot.

The north and south sections of the landfill have already been filled. The active western portion has collected 39 million tons of trash with room for an additional 19 million tons. At the current pace — 988,000 tons of solid waste and 348,000 tons of greenery added annually — the projected closure date is 2022.

City officials were adamant that whoever took over operations would have to assume the landfill’s liabilities, including any costs associated to its eventual closure.

Bob Gregory, chief executive and principal owner of Texas Disposal Systems, said he was “unable to come to a comfort level” in large part because of the environment liability and questions over what role the military would play.

“It’s a wonderful opportunity. We were very excited about the prospect, still are excited about the prospect if they want to do it under a different set of circumstances,” he said. “It was a business deal that had a great deal of financial risk.”

In a statement, Allied Waste also said it would prefer an operational agreement rather than a purchase. A Waste Management official didn’t return a call for comment.

The goal had been to hand the city’s lease over to a private company that would, in turn, give the city a steep discount on dumping fees and pay the city an annual franchise fee of as much as $10 million. That money could then be spent on public safety, parks and libraries.

That’s not possible today. The landfill’s $37 million budget is fee-based and stands apart from the city’s $1.1 billion operating budget. The law does not allow the city to use the fees except at the landfill.

The separate fund also results in the city, which is prohibited from charging most residents for trash pickup, having to pay dumping fees at Miramar of up to $11 million annually from its operating budget.

Now the city will try the less aggressive route of managed competition, a change viewed by some as an opportunity for the roughly 130 city employees who would have lost their jobs had the landfill been sold. Now they’ll be given a chance to submit their own proposal against private firms for the work.

Joan Raymond, head of the city’s blue-collar union which represents many of those workers, was on vacation and didn’t immediately return a call for comment.

City Council President Tony Young said the mayor has taken a prudent approach with the landfill.

“I think we have to have an understanding of what our assets, especially a big asset like that, is worth,” Young said. “Now we’ve found that there’s not a big market for it for whatever reason. I’m actually really happy that now the employees get a chance to bid on it and the taxpayers will be able to get probably a better price in regards to running it because it’s going to have some competition involved.”

The Mayor’s Office is expected to begin the managed competition process for the landfill in May or June, but final approval may not come until mid-2012.

Call 480-241-9994 or Click us today to reach our trained professionals to discuss your needs today.

Source: Sign On San Diego and WIH Resource Group, Inc. (WIH)

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ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP
WIH Resource Group is a global leader and provider of comprehensive waste management, recycling, transportation/logistical and business solutions, specializing in, among other services, waste management operational performance assessments, transportation / logistics, alternative fuels use, solid waste planning, waste and recycling market studies, business development, business valuations, due diligence and Mergers and Acquistions (M&A) transactional support and environmental services. 

WIH Resource Group’s experience includes the oversight of operations, maintenance, finance, human resources, business development, sales, safety and environmental compliance while maintaining responsibility for multi-million dollar publicly and privately held assets including: a variety of collection operations, Sub-title D and hazardous and Class II landfills, transfer stations, intermodal facilities, recycling centers, buyback centers, material recovery facilities, vehicle and container maintenance operations, call centers and payment processing operations.
Based in Phoenix, Arizona, the company serves both private companies and public sector Agency clients throughout North America and internationally.  To learn more about WIH Resource Group, Inc. visit http://www.wihrg.com

For Additional information on WIH Resource Group, Inc. contact:
Bob Wallace, Principal & VP of Client Solutions
WIH Resource Group – Waste Management, Recycling and Logistical Solutions
Email: admin@wihrg.com Phone: 480-241-9994

Website: http://www.wihrg.com
Daily News Blog: http://www.wihresourcegroup.wordpress.com
Follow WIH Resource Group on Twitter: http://twitter.com/wihresource

ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP

WIH Resource Group is a global leader and provider of comprehensive waste management, recycling, transportation/logistical and business solutions, specializing in, among other services, waste management operational performance assessments, transportation / logistics, alternative fuel use, solid waste planning, waste and recycling market studies, business development and environmental services.  Based in Phoenix, the company serves both private and public sector clients throughout North America and globally.  Our customers include both public agencies and private sector businesses customers throughout North America. To learn more visit http://www.wihrg.com

About the WIH Resource Group’s Principal Bob Wallace, Principal and Vice President of Client Solutions, WIH Resource Group, Inc. (WIH) and Waste Savings, Inc. (WSI), former Boardmember SWANA ~ State of Arizona Chapter (Solid Waste Association of North America), APWA (American Public Works) ~ National Solid Waste Rate Setting Advisory Committee and Member of WASTEC (Waste Equipment Technology Association) NSWMA ~ Phoenix, Arizona USA. (bwallace@wihresourcegroup.com).

WIH Resource Group’s White Paper on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fuel Use in Refuse Collection Vehicles Industry is Available for Purchasing:   The entire 65-plus page report and Appendices: $299.00 US Funds – Visa and Mastercard Accepted.

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Phone: 480.241.9994 ~ E-mail: admin@wihrg.com

Should you have any questions about this news or general questions about our diversified services, please contact Bob Wallace, Principal & VP of Client Solutions at WIH Resource Group and Waste Savings, Inc. at admin@wihrg.com

Feel free to visit our websites for additional information on our services at: http://www.wihrg.com and our daily blog at https://wihresourcegroup.wordpress.com

WIH Resource Group on Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/in/wihresourcegroup

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