The History of the Automated Side Loader – How One Small City Changed The Industry Forever


The modern refuse truck operator has it pretty easy today compared to his peers of yesteryear. Gone are the days of the “Vic Tanney” bodies and the driver lugging around 55 gallon drums on their backs. For haulers and drivers who collected trash for the majority of their lives, they were lucky if they could continue to stand up straight by the time they were 50 and their bodies weren’t completely broken. In 1968, the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that the injury rate among refuse collectors was higher than the rate for coal miners, police officer, firefighter or loggers. A report put out between 1969 to 1971 showed that nationally there were 98.8 disabling accidents per million man hours worked in refuse collection. Those numbers are staggering when compared with the next closest industry, police departments, which had 48.15 accidents per million man hours. A fact not surprising considering the nature of the job. Workers were required to jump on and off the truck continually, handle hundreds of containers, many of which were overweight and easy to drop.

An average worker could lift up to 6 tons a day and walk up to 11 miles in all type of weather, which led to multiple injuries and massive insurance claims to the hauler (if they offered insurance) and time away from work. This is why, even today, refuse collection is listed in the Top 10 most dangerous jobs in America. Why do you think so many of the articles in this publication and those like it are filled with safety related items? It’s a major concern and issue even with the advanced technology modern refuse trucks are built upon.

Now there has always been a drive in the industry from the truck manufacturers to deliver the highest compaction body to maximize on-route time over the competition yet they all required one key ingredient before the early 1980s: manual loading. Commercial collection already saw vast improvements in safety, productivity and cleanliness with the introduction of the Front End Loaders (the industry’s first automated truck) in the 1950s. Unfortunately, residential drivers wouldn’t start seeing some relief for another few decades. Let’s explore this history more in-depth.

Automated Side Loader

The City that Birthed a Revolution

Scottsdale, Arizona, a town northeast of Phoenix, incorporated in 1954 with a population of 2,032. After having a major annexation in 1961 that more than doubled its population, the city took over refuse collection from private contractors in March 1964. From 1960 to 1970, the city population increased from 10,026 to 67,823. The new Refuse Division was put under the direction of Marc Stragier, the director of Public Works. Looking at all the available systems at the time, Scottsdale chose to use the recently developed “Refuse Train” system used in many parts of the country. Even though the Train method was an improvement over the use of rear loaders, it still carried all the negative attributes of manual collection. Scottsdale also experienced a high personnel turnover rate due to the 110+ degree working conditions during summer months.

In 1965, the City Manager, Assistant City manager and three Department Heads formed a brainstorming club apart from the city to develop and promote new ideas. They called themselves Government Innovators and among some of the ideas to emerge was the concept of mechanized refuse collection. After searching for a body manufacturer to partner and develop the idea with, Marc found George Morrison, owner of Western Body and Hoist in Los Angeles. After some convincing and motivation, the creative juices in George’s head started to flow and a few months later, George and his lead engineer Otto Ganter met with Marc to show him a concept idea called the “Barrel Snatcher” based off their Wesco-Jet Front Loader platform.

Taking the idea and drawing to Bill Donaldson, Scottsdale City Manager for final approval, the City applied for a Federal grant to develop a mechanized residential refuse collection system. After the initial application was sent back, the Department of Health, Education and Welfare sent a representative down to help edit and draft a second application. The new application proposed a two-phase demonstration: Phase 1—to determine if the concept was practical using city provided containers and if successful; Phase 2—build the sophisticated Barrel Snatcher truck to prove mechanized collection was economical and cost effective. The second draft was approved and awarded in February 1969 with the grant period lasting from March 1969 to June 1972.

Automated Side Loader

Phase 1: Godzilla

Now faced with building a proof of concept truck, it was decided to use a 1964 International Lodal Front Loader not in active service as the test bed. Marc designed the mechanical grabber assembly to attach to the front of the arms and after $2,000 in repairs were made to the truck to make it useable, construction and modifications began. The mechanic in charge of creating the grabber assembly, Chuck Kalinowski, remembers constructing the mechanism, “I didn’t know that Marc was in the shop one day and I was working on the slide, trying to figure out what he wanted there for the arm to grab the container. So I tried two or three different things, you know, just things we had around the place here. I said ‘Aw, for crying out loud, they want you to build something but they won’t give you the material, they want you to build a darned monster… a Godzilla!’ Marc was standing right behind me and from that time on, that’s what it was called.”

After some trial and error, Godzilla was finally ready to go on route in August 1969. The first container it picked up slipped through the grabber and fell into the hopper. Next, the brakes locked up and truck couldn’t be moved. After modifications and repairs, the truck operated for the next six months proving the concept of mechanized collection was sound.

An often overlooked aspect of creating and later adopting a mechanized collection system is the container cost associated with it. For the city, to order a “set” of containers and collection trucks ran about $40,000 (pre-additional modification) for equipment and about $120,000 the containers in 1970 dollars. Scottsdale had many alley routes and after a survey, they decided to use container sizes of 80, 160 and 300 gallons for collection service. The size of the container the customer received was determined by the number of days picked up, either once or twice, and the number of houses per container: one, two or four. It broke down to each household receiving at least 160 gallons of refuse capacity per week. County Plastics was initially awarded the contract for 350 containers in each of the three sizes. After the Phase 1 trials were complete, it was determined that the 80 and 300 gallon containers were the most effective. 300 gallons were used on alley streets while the 80-gallon shined the best for street-side collection. Godzilla and later Son of Godzilla was the most successful in the alleys with the 300 gallon, but too slow and bulky for the 80 gallon service.

Automated Side Loader

Phase 2: Son of Godzilla

Western Body and Hoist’s Barrel Snatcher was a modified version of their Wesco-Jet Front Loader. The Wesco Jet was a 35yd full pack body that evenly distributed the weight over two axles with four super single tires and a specialized cab designed and engineered jointly by Reo Motors and Western. Complete with an Allison automatic transmission and a narrow, air conditioned telephone booth cab, the Barrel Snatcher weighed in empty at 22,500 lbs. and had a GVWR of 36,500 on the two axles. With three years of engineering going into its design, the Barrel Snatcher featured an 8-foot boom, which could extend out to 12 feet to grab the 300 gallon containers. Cycle time from pick up to set down was only 20 seconds.

Modifications and improvements were required after the first unit went online in October 1970. A joystick was added later to help improve operator control as the boom had a tendency to knock down fences in the alleys due to the uncontrollability of the rotary motor that swung it. The frame at the base of the boom was beefed up due to frequent cracking due to weight, in addition to a heavier duty rotary motor that swung the heavy boom. The extension cylinder was moved to the outside of the boom to reduce the six hour repair time needed to get at it when it was mounted inside. The city sent these lists of improvements to Western to be implemented on the second truck they ordered.

Due to the national popularity of the Phase 1 Godzilla truck, the Barrel Snatcher was affectionately called the “Son of Godzilla”, which only served to fuel local and national interest in what Scottsdale was trying to do. The city invested a lot of time and effort to sell the new concept to the public and they constantly fielded requests from foreign dignitaries, state and city governments to come and personally view the trucks in action and on route.

During the construction of the second Barrel Snatcher, George Morrison’s partner and co-owner was killed in an accident. In order to provide and take care of his partner’s widow, George decided to sell the company to Maxon Industries in December 1970. After study, Maxon expressed no desire to continue development, sales or orders for Barrel Snatcher concept with the City, although they did agree to honor the original contract for two additional trucks. The City received many postponements and delay’s from Maxon and finally threatened to sue for breach of contract. None of the improvements recommended by the city were implemented in the second truck when it was delivered in May 1971. The mechanics were well versed in the necessary improvements and changes needed to be made and when the second truck started going on route, the original Godzilla that was built to last six months of the concept phase was finally retired after two years on route.

Automated Side Loader

The Concept Fully Realized

After Phase 2 was complete and the third and final Barrel Snatcher was delivered from Maxon in 1973 (two years after it had been ordered), the city continued to improve upon the arm design and even modified three city owned Wesco-Jet Front Loaders to Barrel Snatcher configuration in-house to expand their growing mechanized routes. However, they realized a more permanent solution was needed when it came time to start replacing their aging fleet. Marc Straiger continued to work on designs for an improved automated arm that could be fit to different side load bodies and was not specific to the now discontinued Maxon Wesco-Jet. He designed a prototype to be tested on one of the city’s experimental truck beds and it later came to be known as the “Rapid Rail” arm. It consisted of a grabber assembly with rollers on the rear which allowed it to slide up and down the rail that curved at the top to invert and empty the container.

The city eventually ended up abandoning the project, yet a few companies had taken the idea for Marc’s “Rapid Rail” and developed it into an effective system by 1978. Government Innovators (now a fully realized company), Arizona Special Projects and Ebeling Manufacturing Corp (EMCO) all offered a version of this arm to the public. EMCO was the first company to offer market ready automated packages with their arm design based on Straiger’s “Rapid Rail” for commercial side load dumpsters. However, their arm could be easily modified with “Rapid Rail” grippers for cart collection. Maxon, who had no interest in pursuing further Barrel Snatcher product development with the city after their purchase of Western, finally saw the future in automation and offered their integrated Eagle cab and body truck with an arm copy of the Rapid Rail by 1980.

When it came time for the city to start replacing their worn out fleet of Barrel Snatchers in 1978, they turned to International Harvester chassis with Norcal Waste Equipment 24yd bodies fitted with a modified EMCO lift arm. Each truck cost the city $58,000, which was a bargain compared to the last Barrel Snatcher that cost a low estimate of $63,230. What many people don’t know is that Norcal in Oakland, CA was started after the sale of Western by Otto Ganter, the lead engineer and designer of the Barrel Snatcher.

The Numbers Don’t Lie

In 1980, the city did a comparison to see if the mechanized trucks lived up to their original idea and potential. The numbers were quite staggering and especially in an unforgiving climate like Southern Arizona, well worth the effort and money spent. According to the records and findings from the city: in 1968, 34 men were employed to collect 17,800 homes twice a week. By 1980, 13 residential routes were needed to collect 24,000 homes twice weekly with 13 drivers. The city estimated that if the train method was still being used in 1980, 18 pickup trucks, 72 trailers, seven front loaders and more than 60 men would be required. The injury rate was also reduced from 36 preventable injuries a year average using the train system to only 1 in 1980.

Production rates also increased per man. In 1968, the average was 95 tons per man compared to 212 tons by 1980. They also showed a drastic reduction in employee turnover from 91 percent in 1986 to one employee who left and transferred to another department within the city. While some of the costs of running more advanced trucks were passed on to the residents in terms of monthly collection cost, the state of their streets, alleys and roadways was greatly improved over manual collection, which often left trash and debris in its wake. Their aggressive advertisement and citizen buyoff of the program went a long way to mitigate the town’s outcry over the increase in cost.

Slow to Catch On

Throughout the 1980s, body manufacturers continued to develop and improve the automated arm. For the average hauler, however, it was a gigantic investment in new fleets and carts—one that they were hesitant to make. Municipalities were some of the early adopters to automation due to the fact that they could justify the initial investment by projecting the savings over long term. Automated technology didn’t really take hold nationwide until the 1990s when the technology and arms were more proven and reliable. Even today, the arm design on an ASL is the most competitive feature builders continue to refine and market. Some builders have multiple arm or gripper designs available for customers to choose from, each with their own unique use and application. Also, many haulers tend to stick to one design because it’s a system they adopted early on and know and trust. I can say with absolute confidence that there is no “best arm and gripper” on the market. Each has their strengths in different conditions (alley, confined space, parked cars) and some perform better than others. The Automated Side Loader is still the new kid on the block compared to the rest of the refuse truck styles and there hasn’t been an “industry” standard design established yet. But next time you see one on the road or hop in one to run your route, think about the blood, sweat and cursing a special group of men invested to make your lives a little bit easier and a whole lot safer.

Zachary Geroux is a videographer, photographer, historian and owner of Refuse Truck Photography, which focuses on media and marketing for the Waste Industry. He lives in Western Washington with his wife and newborn son who will soon fall in love with garbage trucks. Currently, he works full time for the Air Force and is focused on growing his business. He has been driving garbage trucks off and on for the past 10 years and considers it the best job he’s ever had. He can be reached at (541) 301-1507, via e-mail at Zachary@refusetruckphotography.com or visit www.refusetruckphotography.com.

*Special thanks to the City of Scottsdale for sending me years and years ago their self-published booklet “Revolutionizing an Industry.” Without this amazing documentation of strife and effort to create and field this system, this article and the knowledge contained within might have been lost forever to the coming generations.

Reposted by WIH Resource Group
For more information, Visit our website by CLICKING HERE and contact us today to see how we can best serve you by phone at 480.241.9994 or by e-mail at admin@wihrg.com

Visit our new website!   www.wihresourcegroup.com

wihwebsite

ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP

Celebrating a decade in business, WIH Resource Group is a global provider of professional technical and management support services to a broad range of markets, including waste management, recycling, financials, transportation, M&A due diligence and support, alternative fuel fleet conversions, facilities, environmental, energy for private sector business and government clients.

WIH Resource Group is a leader in all of the key markets that it serves. WIH Resource Group provides a blend of global reach, local knowledge, innovation and technical excellence in delivering solutions that create, enhance and sustain the world’s built, natural and social environments.  WIH Resource Group serves clients in more than 175 key markets internationally.

WIH Website logo

More information on WIH Resource Group and its services can be found at www.wihrg.com.

Click on an image below to take you to WIH’s other sites!

Renewable Portfolio Standards drive the waste-to-energy industry


There is one single, constant driver that can propel the WTE industry forward or hold it back, and that’s renewable portfolio standards (RPS). These RPS’s are policies in 29 states and Washington, DC to increase renewable energy, usually from wind, solar, biomass, and sometimes landfill gas and municipal solid waste.

USA Renewables by State

How much capital is allocated to each of these sources depends on what “tier” within the RPS it is placed. Tier 1 generates more revenue than tier 2, allowing WTE technologies in this higher category to compete with solar and wind, which are the energy-producing forerunners right now. While biomass, biogas, and other WTE grew by 15% since 2008, wind grew by 65% in 2014 alone.

Then there is a market driver at the federal level: the Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA). The law requires utilities to buy electricity from a qualified facility, but to only pay what it would cost the utility to produce that electricity.

“So they pay a relatively small amount, which rarely pencils out for renewable energy producers,” said Brian Lips, DSIRE project manager at North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center. “But the RPS places [renewable energy producers] in a position where they don’t have to compete with fossil fuels; rather they compete against other renewables.”

Sometimes biomass, one of the more widely used WTE sources, is in tier 1 on the RPS. But what counts as biomass gets tricky as there is no standard definition; so feedstocks under this umbrella vary but could include organic materials like trees, crops, and animal waste.

How Maryland pays out for trash-to-energy

One state standing out on the WTE front is Maryland, the only state in the country that places trash-burning incinerators in tier 1, according to Energy Justice Network Founder and Director Mike Ewall. This incentive drew New York-based Energy Answers International to Baltimore, where it got a permit in 2010 to build what would have been the largest incinerator in the country — one that environmentalists vehemently protested, arguing the emissions would threaten public health.

Just last week, following a long, hard fight between Energy Answers and its opponents, Maryland announced that the incinerator project is no longer valid, stating the permit became void after an extended construction delay.

Some states have left trash incineration out of the RPS altogether, such as New York, which only allows the burning of biomass. However, that state is subsidizing crop burning. “Rarely can you make it work to grow crops just to burn them; it’s too expensive. But New York and Iowa have burned grass and or trees for electricity,” said Ewall.

Meanwhile, commercial scale trash-burning incinerators seem to be fading from the landscape. One to be built in West Palm Beach will be the first such plant launched in 20 years, at least on a new site. Many others are shuttering or at risk of closing, with the number currently in operation having fallen under 80 for the first time in decades, largely because of their cost.

Introducing more energy sources to the playing field

In quest of new options, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia have put fossil fuels in their RPS, bringing a whole new category onto the playing field. “They are the first ones [and only ones] to do this,” said Ewall. He added that Ohio has put nuclear in their portfolio in addition to fossil fuels. And a fairly new industry direction is to pelletize trash and market it to existing boiler plants for energy.

Some of the growing options — and their price tags — are sparked by regulations mandating the amount of electricity that utilities must derive from renewable resources.

“In California where 50% of energy has to come from renewable sources, utilities may pay more. But in North Carolina where just 12.5%  has to be renewable, utilities have more bargaining power,” explained Lips.

The renewable energy market is particularly strong in New Jersey, and Hawaii has the most ambitious goal in the country: 100% renewable energy by 2045, he said. The island state has two motivators: outrageously high electricity rates as it burns imported oil, and its vast renewable energy resources.

How the Federal Clean Power Plan is driving state policies

More change may be on the horizon if EPA’s Clean Power Plan unfolds. It’s part of Obama’s push, claimed to curb greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel and coal-fired power plants, which would allow for natural gas and renewable energies such as biomass, incineration, and natural gas.

Analysts project this law will be a major market driver, and it’s already proving to be, at least in the natural gas front. There are about 300 proposals for gas-fired plants in the United States now, according to Ewall.

“Most were underway before EPA adopted the plan. But they were [further] fueled by the rule. So Clean Power would be a major driver to push for natural gas,” he said.

Source: Waste Dive

Published by WIH Resource Group

Visit our new website!   www.wihresourcegroup.com

wihwebsite

ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP

Celebrating a decade in business, WIH Resource Group is a global provider of professional technical and management support services to a broad range of markets, including waste management, recycling, financials, transportation, M&A due diligence and support, alternative fuel fleet conversions, facilities, environmental, energy for private sector business and government clients.

WIH Resource Group is a leader in all of the key markets that it serves. WIH Resource Group provides a blend of global reach, local knowledge, innovation and technical excellence in delivering solutions that create, enhance and sustain the world’s built, natural and social environments.  WIH Resource Group serves clients in more than 175 key markets internationally.

WIH Website logo

More information on WIH Resource Group and its services can be found at www.wihrg.com.

Click on an image below to take you to WIH’s other sites!

Five Commandments for Down Recycling Commodity Markets


The accumulated wisdom of scrap recycling veterans leads to five important rules to help cope with difficult market conditions.

By Brian Taylor, Editor – Recycling Today

 

 

 

Illustration: Matt Collins

 

Scrap recycling company owners and managers live in a workday world in which changes can occur suddenly or, conversely, in which a distressed market can linger far longer than what is tolerated in many other sectors.

Industry veterans, thus, are not greatly surprised when prices drop sharply and stay low for an extended period, and likewise they have seen previous stretches where material generation goes into an extended slump.

The ability for a company to survive an extended downturn takes not just experience and knowledge, industry veterans say, but also discipline and foresight.

An entire management book could be written based on the accumulated knowledge possessed by recyclers who have weathered three or more market downturns of the sort that have put some of their competitors into receivership.

For the purpose of trying to distill some of that same knowledge into a format that can fit into a magazine article, what follows are five rules or commandments that fit within any lengthier volume offering advice on how scrap recyclers can manage through turbulent times.

By no means do these five commandments (or, if you prefer, strong recommendations) tell recyclers everything they need to know about how to survive a downturn. However, based on the common threads that emerged in talking to recycling industry veterans, they offer a good place to start.

i. thou shalt not take on burdensome debt.

Business loans and good banking relationships are as integral to the scrap business as to any other industry or service sector. What scrap recyclers seem to overwhelmingly agree on, however, is that the volatile revenue stream inherent to recycling means that debt-to-equity ratios that might be acceptable in other sectors can be a recipe for insolvency in the scrap business.

“Historically, it has proven to be true that lulls in business are great times to make changes: equipmentwise, efficiencywise and even just a change in business direction.” – Keith Highiet, Modesto Junk Co.

When scrap prices plunge and scrap volumes diminish, the monthly revenue for a scrap firm changes dramatically.

Recycling company owners may not agree precisely on when it is suitable to take out a loan or how much debt is too much, but they are nearly unanimous on the idea that there is a line that should not be crossed.

Overall, for a business to achieve a certain scale, “debt is not avoidable,” says Kevin Gershowitz, a principal owner of Gershow Recycling, Medford, New York. “But many times, industry members don’t manage debt well,” he continues. “While too much debt is never a good idea [in any business sector], in a commodity business and in a weak market, too much debt is a death knell.”

Melvin Lipsitz of M. Lipsitz & Co. Ltd., Waco, Texas, offers a blunt assessment: “Debt is a bad thing anytime. Typically, the interest you pay on debt and the typical net margin of profit for this industry [mean] the cost of money, even at low interest rates, can dissolve profits.”

Nonferrous scrap recycler Mark Lewon of Utah Metal Works, Salt Lake City, says that among the many scrap firms that purchased auto shredders during the (largely) bull market from 2003 to 2013, those who financed their purchases likely have learned a hard lesson.

Lewon, who also currently serves as chair-elect of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), Washington, states, “The buildup in shredders was fueled by debt. Now few, if any, shredders get enough material to run more than a couple of days per week. If that amount of volume isn’t enough to cover the payments, there is going to be a problem.”

Industry veteran Albert Cozzi, currently a principal with Bellwood, Illinois-based Cozzi Recycling, expresses a cynical view toward lenders, commenting, “Banks will always lend you whatever you want, as long as you don’t need it.”

The distressing corollary to that, he says, is that “in this environment,” when recyclers may benefit from a loan to supplement slumping revenue, banks “are just not lending to commodity-related businesses.”

Lewon says, “Debt is a tool, but it is a dangerous tool in that if the calculations for servicing that debt are inaccurate, and if volumes or margins fall short, disaster ensues.

“The bottom line is that the less debt a company has going into difficult economic times, the better the chances of its survival,” he adds.

ii. know thy costs.

Making a concerted effort to understand where outbound dollars are going and whether they are being spent wisely is an endeavor that proves worthwhile far beyond the scrap recycling industry. This knowledge proves particularly critical in a scrap industry downturn, however, when it comes time to react quickly to new market dynamics.

Sources cite careful recordkeeping and industry experience as factors that help savvier operators fully understand how and where money is being spent. “Those operators or entities who have been through prior low cycles understand the basic rule of ‘know your costs,’ managing your costs and keeping your costs low,” Kevin Gershowitz says. “This rule also allows for greater profits during better markets. The experience factor is very important.”

Steven Safran, president of Chicago-based wire processing firm Safran Metals, advises, “You should be running the business the same in the good times and the bad times, not just waiting for the bad times to ask, ‘Oh, where can I cut my costs?’”

Kevin Gershowitz expresses the same thought, saying, “The only way to survive the wake-up call [of a tough market] is to eliminate waste and fat. In good markets, efficiency can wane and costs rise. It’s easy to keep paying. However, in bad markets, those players that consciously choose to survive deliberately review their costs, efficiencies and spending.”

Cozzi offers a similar perspective, saying, “I am a big believer that operationally, when things are good, you run things as if things were going to get bad. That way, when things do turn bad, you don’t have to make many operational changes.”

The hard work is in the details, Cozzi adds, remarking, “It is important to look at every line item on the income statement regularly to see where costs can be reduced. Also, it is important to look at every item on the balance sheet to see where cash can be squeezed out.”

“The less debt a company has going into difficult economic times, the better the chances of its survival.” Mark Lewon, Utah Metal Works

When a downturn hits, “Yes, you may have to change to adjust to volumes,” he says, “but whether things are good or bad, you have to look at your business every day and find ways to be more efficient and continually improve operations.”

John Tiziani, chief financial officer of Gershow Recycling, sums up this management principle by stating, “The companies that know every detail to their businesses survive in low markets and thrive in high markets.”

iii. thou shalt not overpay for material.

The adage “Scrap is bought, not sold” is one of the first phrases someone new to the industry learns, and the importance of the phrase is magnified when scrap buyers are operating in a declining or depressed market.

In bad times or good, prices paid for inbound material are likely the biggest numbers on the expenses side of the ledger, so avoiding overpaying is directly related to the “Know thy costs” commandment.

What veteran recyclers observe, however, is that overpaying can cause even more harm to a company’s balance sheet during bad times, and yet some company managers have a greater tendency to make this mistake in a market slump as they try to meet volume projections.

“Warren Buffet says, ‘You cannot buy market share; you can only rent it for a short period,” Cozzi says. He says the purchase of any grade from any supplier should be scrutinized as to whether it is contributing to profitability.

“Most scrap companies are looking at average cost of their purchases rather than incremental cost or marginal cost of both their feedstock and their operating expenses,” Cozzi says. “During good or bad times, the most important financial metric is contribution margin. Very often those marginal tons are providing negative contribution margin.”

Cozzi, who helped run Chicago-based Cozzi Iron & Metal before that family business was sold to Metal Management Inc. (now Sims Metal Management) in 1998, says maximizing volume may keep machinery active, but that does not necessarily make it the right approach.

“Whether our family ran one or 40 yards, we always did a sensitivity analysis for each yard to make assumptions [about] what price would provide what tonnage, and at what levels is contribution margin maximized. Generally, that answer is at a lower tonnage and lower price point.”

Safran says his family company has remained a modestly sized business in part because it follows this same logic, even during boom markets. “This is the reason Safran Metals has been lean over the years: If we’re looking to pick up new business, we want to pick up business that makes sense. We’re not just looking to pick up marginal business. And I’m guessing too many dealers pick up marginal business, and especially business where you also have to increase your overhead. If so, then you’re putting yourself in more of a risk situation.”

Elliott Gershowitz, a co-principal at Gershow Recycling, along with his brother Kevin, comments, “Don’t overpay for market share on the basis of more volume. You can make the same profit if not more sometimes just by widening your spread and working on lower volumes.”

Kevin Gershowitz elaborates, saying, “Overpaying for raw material is a contagious, infectious disease. The old adage of ‘Make it up in volume’ is just as false today as it was then.” He concludes, “One has to be smart when buying. One needs smart buyers when buying. Anyone can buy if they overpay.”

iv. thou shalt not neglect good people.

When a downturn hits and then lingers, it becomes exceedingly difficult for a company manager to avoid painful personnel decisions. The negative impacts are clear to the employees being laid off or terminated and can be nearly as traumatic for the managers who have to make and communicate these decisions to their employees.

More subtle but of great importance in the long term is the risk to a company’s future when employees who are critical to the workplace knowledge base, culture, morale and future productivity gains of a company are among those who are terminated or leave the company after a payroll cut.

When asked about cost cuts to avoid during difficult times, Keith Highiet of Modesto Junk Co., Modesto, California, says, “Neglecting equipment or losing good people are not options. There are other expenses that can be cut first.”

A recycling company that wishes to retain its key employees through a downturn may need to turn to reduced hours as a cost-cutting technique. “Reduced hours and having good supervision are the keys,” Lipsitz says.

Safran says, “I have never laid anybody off [because of business conditions], maybe because we’ve been lean and mean. The workers help me make money in the good times, and I look at it that I have to take care of them in the bad times. We may need to cut back on hours, but if you have good people, and you spend money training them, you look at what you have to do to keep key employees.”

Lewon says good communication prevents workers from either being blindsided by bad news or from failing to understand the seriousness of a market downturn. “Explain to your people exactly what is going on so that they are aware,” he comments.

Even with the best management practices, “I think that choices have to be made,” Lewon says, when it comes to adjusting personnel levels to meet market realities. “Don’t be afraid to let marginal employees go. Tell the good employees that you want to keep them and that you will work with them to help them make it.”

v. continue to invest in quality.

When scrap prices are low and volumes have slowed to a trickle, it is likely that cash flow conditions will be on the tight side of the spectrum as well. A combination of tight cash flow and a commitment to avoid burdensome debt would seem to make a downturn an unlikely time to invest in operations improvements. However, veteran recyclers warn that neglecting one’s equipment for any consi

derable amount of time is likely to yield negative results. Retaining a high level of quality in operations starts with equipment maintenance, recyclers seemed to unanimously agree. (See the sidebar “Always Maintain”)

Beyond that important rule, veteran recyclers also say a market slump can provide managers with available time to research new equipment, adding that they often encounter equipment makers eager to make a sale during a lull.

“Historically, it has proven to be true that lulls in business are great times to make changes: equipmentwise, efficiencywise and even just a change in business direction,” says Highiet.

“Often, equipment salespeople are willing to deal in order to make sales in tough times,” Lewon says. “For anyone with cash and a long-term view, sometimes difficult times can be a great time to buy equipment.”

Kevin Gershowitz, who has encountered the same circumstance, says, “Better deals can be had on certain equipment from those sellers in need of making sales.”

Yet more critical than saving a few dollars, he says, is preparing to be competitive in the long run. “More important than the savings on the investment is the ability to be ready to go when the markets recover,” he states.

Kevin Gershowitz also points to the importance of keeping in mind the extended research, purchase and installation timeline for such a project.

“The workers help me make money in the good times, and I look at it that I have to take care of them in the bad times.” – Steven Safran, Safran Metals

“On some scrap processing equipment, from investigation to contract to install, it can take over a year for new processing equipment to become operational. Installing now and being in the game when the market recovers is better than beginning to install when the market recovers and then begin operating when the market tanks again,” he comments.

The first quarter of 2016 has provided financial press headlines pertaining in particular to China’s economy and the woes of the global steel industry that may well help to prolong the difficulties in the commodities sector.

Recycling industry veterans are far from complacent, but they do profess a certain amount of faith that abiding by time-tested management principles will help make the slump bearable.

“This downturn is having real consequences,” Highiet says. However, he adds, “The ability and wherewithal to weather prior [slumps], from controlling costs to accepting smaller profit margins with reduced flows of scrap, are helpful to rely upon in the current environment.”

Kevin Gershowitz says, “The fixed costs of operating a scrap yard are real and very expensive. The percent of gross margin needed to cover costs increases as market pricing lowers. When pricing is high, margins are wide and just about any company or individual can generate profits. Low pricing is a different business skill set. As market pricing lowers, margins get squeezed and do not expand. This explains many of the closures we read about.”

Cozzi returns to the idea of veteran leadership as making a difference for some scrap companies. “I believe that people in the industry prior to 2000 do have an advantage over people who are more recent to the business. They have lived through the cycles of the commodities market and of the economy,” he states.

Whether the rest of 2016 brings with it low prices or rising prices, employees of scrap companies with veteran leaders are likely to hear from them with variations of these five commandments and other lessons learned from previous experience.

Author: The author is editor of Recycling Today, Brian Taylor

Source: Recycling Today

Published by WIH Resource Group

ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP

Celebrating a decade in business, WIH Resource Group is a global provider of professional technical and management support services to a broad range of markets, including waste management, recycling, financials, transportation, M&A due diligence and support, alternative fuel fleet conversions, facilities, environmental, energy for private sector business and government clients.

WIH Resource Group is a leader in all of the key markets that it serves. WIH Resource Group provides a blend of global reach, local knowledge, innovation and technical excellence in delivering solutions that create, enhance and sustain the world’s built, natural and social environments.  WIH Resource Group serves clients in more than 175 key markets internationally.

More information on WIH Resource Group and its services can be found at www.wihrg.com.

Click Here to Check out our Industry News Blog
Follow us on Twitter: @wihresource

WIH Ten Year Celebration Logo

 

West Coast Boasts Highest Average Tip Fees in the Nation


Exclusive analysis completed by the Environmental Research and Education Foundation (EREF) shows that the Pacific region boasts the highest average tip fees in the country.

EREF maintains a database of 1,637 active Subtitle D MSW landfills across the U.S. This data base was used to develop a sample consisting of nearly 300 landfills that were categorized as large, medium and small. Large landfills process an average of 744,000 tons/year, while medium and small landfills processed 144,000 tons/year and 13,000 tons/year, respectively.

Live floor trailer

Landfill owners in this sample where then contacted and asked to provide gate rate information on their tip fees.  Of those contacted, 117 landfills reported their tip fee information, giving a response rate of roughly 40 percent. The data were then compiled by geographic region and basic statistical information computed.

The data show a national tip fee average of $48.27/ton.  However, there was substantial variation given the lowest and highest tip fees ranged from $14.47 to $119.00, respectively.  On average, lowest tip fees tended to be in the South Central region of the US while the highest were in the Pacific region.

Average Tip Fees for U.S. Landfills (January 2016). Source: EREF
Region States Average Tip Fee Std Dev Min. Max
Pacific AL, AZ, CA, HI, ID, NV, OR, WA $61.20 $26.43 $24.00 $108.00
Northeast CT, DE, ME, MD, MA, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT, VA, WV $58.20 $21.74 $17.00 $114.00
Southeast AL, FL, GA, KY, MS, NC, SC, TN $44.46 $25.06 $19.75 $119.00
Mountains/Plains CO, MT, ND, SD, UT, WY $43.38 $21.47 $21.00 $110.00
Midwest IL, IN, IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, NE, OH, WI $39.64 $16.46 $14.47 $85.00
South Central AR, LA, NM, OK, TX $36.34 $20.63 $16.00 $72.00
National Average $48.27 $23.09 $14.47 $119.00

Source: Waste360 and WasteDive

Published by WIH Resource Group

ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP

Celebrating a decade in business, WIH Resource Group is a global provider of professional technical and management support services to a broad range of markets, including waste management, recycling, financials, transportation, M&A due diligence and support, alternative fuel fleet conversions, facilities, environmental, energy for private sector business and government clients.

WIH Resource Group is a leader in all of the key markets that it serves. WIH Resource Group provides a blend of global reach, local knowledge, innovation and technical excellence in delivering solutions that create, enhance and sustain the world’s built, natural and social environments.  WIH Resource Group serves clients in more than 175 key markets internationally.

More information on WIH Resource Group and its services can be found at www.wihrg.com.

Click Here to Check out our Industry News Blog
Follow us on Twitter: @wihresource

WIH Ten Year Celebration Logo

List of Top Waste Management Twitter Users


ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP

Celebrating a decade in business, WIH Resource Group is a global provider of professional technical and management support services to a broad range of markets, including waste management, recycling, financials, transportation, M&A due diligence and support, alternative fuel fleet conversions, facilities, environmental, energy for private sector business and government clients.

WIH Resource Group is a leader in all of the key markets that it serves. WIH Resource Group provides a blend of global reach, local knowledge, innovation and technical excellence in delivering solutions that create, enhance and sustain the world’s built, natural and social environments.  WIH Resource Group serves clients in more than 175 key markets internationally.

More information on WIH Resource Group and its services can be found at www.wihrg.com.

Click Here to Check out our Industry News Blog
Follow us on Twitter: @wihresource

Click Here to check out WIH’s You Tube Channel:

WIH Ten Year Celebration Logo

Largest Companies by Revenue in Each State 2015: MAP


You may have seen the Largest Companies by Revenue map put together in June of last year, well we’re back with an updated version using Hoover’s 2015 data.  Last year’s map created so much buzz and insightful conversation that we deemed it essential to find out how it’s changed over the past year.  Using Hoover’s, a D&B Company, we searched through each state’s list of companies to find which had the largest revenue in the last fiscal year.  It was interesting to see how each company’s revenues have changed over the year (for better or worse) and to see if a new largest company had emerged.

WIH -Largest-Companies-by-Revenue-2015.jpg

At first glance, you may ask, “Where are Apple and Microsoft?”  Yes, these are huge companies but this map is specifically looking at total revenue from the last fiscal year.  If we look at California with Apple vs. Chevron, there is a large discrepancy between market value and total revenues.  Apple’s market value as of March 31, 2015 was $724 billion while Chevron’s was only (and we use “only” lightly) $197 billion.  In terms of revenue, Chevron comes out on top with $203 billion in the last fiscal year while Apple had revenues of $182 billion.

Please note: We used Hoover’s company database as our source, not the most recent Fortune 500 list.  Location and state are based on the corporate headquarters of that company, no branches or foreign offices.  Lastly, we decided not to include any subsidiaries or government entities for the sake of staying consistent.

State 2014 Company 2014 Revenue (Billion) 2015 Company 2015 Revenue (Billion) Headquarters
AL Regions Bank $5.89 Regions Bank $5.40 Birmingham AL
AK Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation $4.44 GCI Inc. $0.91 Anchorage AK
AZ Avnet Inc. $25.45 Avnet Inc. $27.49 Phoenix AZ
AR Wal-Mart Stores $476.29 Wal-Mart Stores $485.65 Bentonville AR
CA Chevron Corporation $228.84 Chevron Corporation $211.97 Sam Ramon CA
CO Arrow Electronics Inc. $21.35 Arrow Electronics Inc. $22.78 Inverness CO
CT General Electric $146.04 General Electric $148.58 Fairfield CT
DE E.I du Pont de Nemours and Company $36.14 E.I du Pont de Nemours and Company $36.04 Wilmington DE
FL World Fuel Services $41.56 World Fuel Services $43.38 Miami FL
GA Home Depot International Inc. $85.53 Home Depot International Inc. $85.90 Atlanta GA
HI Hawaiian Electric Industries Inc. $3.23 Hawaiian Electric Industries Inc. $3.23 Honolulu HI
ID Micro Technology Inc. $9.07 Albertson’s LLC. $23.56 Boise ID
IL Archer Daniels Midland $89.80 The Boeing Company $90.76 Chicago IL
IN WellPoint $71.02 Anthem Inc. $73.87 Indianapolis IN
IA Transamerica Life Insurance Company $19.04 Transamerica Life Insurance Company $23.34 Cedar Rapids IA
KS Sprint Communications Inc. $34.56 Koch Industries $115.00 Wichita KS
KY Humana Inc. $42.31 Humana Inc. $48.50 Louisville KY
LA CenturyLink Inc. $18.09 CenturyLink Inc. $18.03 Monroe LA
ME Hannaford Bros. Co. $3.98 Hannaford Bros. Co. $4.41 Scarborough ME
MD Lockheed Martin $45.35 Lockheed Martin $45.60 Bethesda MD
MA Liberty Mutual Holding Company Inc. $38.50 Liberty Mutual Holding Company Inc. $36.94 Boston MA
MI General Motors $155.42 General Motors $155.92 Detroit MI
MN Cargill Inc. $136.65 UnitedHealth Group $130.47 Minnetonka MN
MS Sanderson Farms Inc. $2.68 Koch Foods Incorporated $2.80 Flowood MS
MO Express Scripts Holding $104.09 Express Scripts Holding $100.88 St. Louis MO
MT Stillwater Mining Company $1.03 Stillwater Mining Company $0.94 Billings MT
NE Berkshire Hathaway $182.15 Berkshire Hathaway $194.67 Omaha NE
NV Las Vegas Sands Corp. $13.76 Las Vegas Sands Corp. $14.58 Paradise NV
NH Sprague Resources LP $4.60 C&S Wholesale Grocers Inc. $21.70 Keene NH
NJ Johnson & Johnson $71.31 Johnson & Johnson $74.33 New Brunswick NJ
NM Presbyterian Healthcare Services $4.60 Presbyterian Healthcare Services $2.05 Albuquerque NM
NY Verizon Communications $120.55 Verizon Communications $127.07 New York NY
NC Bank of America $101.69 Bank of America $95.18 Charlotte NC
ND MDU Resources Group Inc. $4.46 MDU Resources Group Inc. $4.67 Bismarck ND
OH Cardinal Health $101.09 The Kroger Co. $108.46 Cincinnati OH
OK Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores Inc. $26.09 Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores Inc. $26.09 Oklahoma City OK
OR Nike Inc. $25.31 Nike Inc. $27.79 Beaverton OR
PA AmeriSourceBergen $87.95 AmeriSourceBergen $119.56 Chesterbrook PA
RI CVS Caremark $126.76 CVS Caremark $139.36 Woonsocket RI
SC Sonoco Products Company $4.48 Sonoco Products Company $5.01 Hartsville SC
SD Sanford Health $3.10 Poet LLC. $6.00 Sioux Falls SD
TN FedEx Corporation $44.28 FedEx Corporation $45.46 Memphis TN
TX Exxon Mobil $438.25 Exxon Mobil $411.93 Irving TX
UT Huntsman Corporation $11.07 Huntsman Corporation $11.57 Salt Lake City UT
VT Keurig Green Mountain Inc. $4.35 Keurig Green Mountain Inc. $4.70 Waterbury VT
VA Freddie Mac $81.22 The Long & Foster Companies Inc. $42.70 Chantilly VA
WA CostCo Wholesale $105.15 CostCo Wholesale $112.64 Issaquah WA
WV West Virginia University Hospitals Inc. $1.38 Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc. $1.24 Morgantown WV
WI Johnson Controls Inc. $42.73 Johnson Controls Inc. $42.82 Milwaukee WI
WY Cloud Peak Energy Inc. $1.39 Cloud Peak Energy Inc. $1.39 Gillette WY

Sources: Hoover’s Inc. A D&B Company, Fortune, Broadview Networks

Published by: WIH Resource Group, Inc.

WIH Ten Year Celebration Logo

You Tube: Click HERE to visit WIH Resource Group’s You Tube Channel

ABOUT THE FOUNDER of WIH RESOURCE GROUP
Bob Wallace, MBA is the Founder and a Principal of WIH Resource Group, Inc. and has over 27 years of experience in waste and recycling collections programs management, transportation / logistics operations, alternative fuels (CNG, LPG, RNG, LNG & biodiesel), Fleet Management, Operational Performance Assessments (OPAs), Waste-by-Rail programs, recycling / solid waste operations, transfer stations, landfills, planning and development. Mr. Wallace has extensive experience in working with clients in both the private and public sectors. Prior to WIH Resource Group, Mr. Wallace served as the Director of Transportation & Logistics for Waste Management, the largest provider of waste management and recycling services in North America. He can be reached at bwallace@wihresourcegroup.com or 480.241.9994. For more information visit http://www.wihrg.com

Contact WIH Resource Group
For more information, Visit our website by CLICKING HERE and contact us today to see how we can best serve you by phone at 480.241.9994 or by e-mail at admin@wihrg.com

WIH Resource Group’s Diversified Client-Specific Services include:

  • Waste Management Consulting
  • Recycling Programs Optimization
  • Alternative Fuels for Truck Fleets
  • Research & Polling – Customer Satisfaction Surveys
  • Landfill Operations Consulting
  • Business and Assets Appraisals & Valuations
  • Collection, Processing, Transfer & Disposal Procurement
  • M&A Due Diligence
  • Waste to Energy & New Technology Evaluation Environmental Services
  • Expert Testimony/Litigation Support
  • Facility Planning & Design
  • Finance and Economic Analysis
  • Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures
  • Operations & Performance Assessment (OPAs)
  • Planning – Solid Waste, Recycling and Program
  • Program Management & Capital Project Planning
  • Rates, Financial Analyses & Appraisals
  • Rates and Regulatory Support
  • Recycling Program Design
  • Renewables / Clean Energy Technology

Click here to request more information about these services & WIH Resource Group

RELATED LINKS: http://www.wihrg.com

Clean Green Renewable Energy

ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP
WIH Resource Group is a global leader and provider of comprehensive waste management consulting, recycling, transportation / logistical and business solutions, specializing in, among other services, waste management operational performance assessments, financial analysis. transportation / logistics, alternative fuel solutions, solid waste planning, waste and recycling market studies, business development, business valuations, due diligence and Mergers and Acquistions (M&A) transactional support and environmental services.

WIH Resource Group’s experience includes the oversight of operations, maintenance, finance, human resources, business development, sales, safety and environmental compliance while maintaining responsibility for multi-million dollar publicly and privately held assets including: a variety of collection operations, Sub-title D and hazardous and Class II landfills, transfer stations, intermodal facilities, recycling centers, buyback centers, material recovery facilities, vehicle and container maintenance operations, call centers and payment processing operations.

Based in Phoenix, Arizona, the company serves both private companies and public sector Agency clients throughout North America and internationally.  To learn more about WIH Resource Group, Inc. visit http://www.wihrg.com .

For Additional information on WIH Resource Group, Inc. contact:
Bob Wallace, Principal & VP of Client Solutions
WIH Resource Group – Waste Management, Recycling and Logistical Solutions
Email: admin@wihrg.com Phone: 480-241-9994

Website: http://www.wihrg.com
Daily News Blog: http://www.wihresourcegroup.wordpress.com
Follow WIH Resource Group on Twitter: http://twitter.com/wihresource

WIH Resource Group’s White Paper on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fuel Use in Refuse Collection Vehicles Industry is Available for Purchasing:   The entire 65-plus page report and Appendices: $299.00 US Funds – Visa and Mastercard Accepted.

CLICK HERE to Order Your Copy today!

Phone: 480.241.9994 ~ E-mail: admin@wihrg.com

Should you have any questions about this news or general questions about our diversified services, please contact Bob Wallace, Principal & VP of Client Solutions at WIH Resource Group and Waste Savings, Inc. at admin@wihrg.com

Feel free to visit our websites for additional information on our services at: http://www.wihrg.com and our daily blog at https://wihresourcegroup.wordpress.com

Follow Bob Wallace and WIH Resource Group on Twitter: http://twitter.com/wihresource

Be sure to check out Invigorated Solutions, Inc.

  1. Follow @invigorsolution on Twitter
  2. Visit our website: http://www.invigoratedsolutions.com/
  3. Like our Facebook Page
  4. Follow Invigorated Solutions on Tumblr

About Invigorated Solutions

Passionate about life, learning, love and sharing their experiences of life, Bob & Tracy Wallace enjoy sharing their invigorated (energizing) solutions / advice and useful life tips for living life to the fullest on their popular life development blog, “Invigorated Solutions”.  Click HERE to visit our website for more valuable information.

Invigorated Solutions Logo - 3d picture format

WIH RESOURCE GROUP WASTESHED MARKET RADIUS STUDIES


Capabilities of the Firm
WIH Resource Group’s team is uniquely qualified to perform Wasteshed Studies due to our industry experience, familiarity with the key regions throughout North America and expertise with clients on similar projects. The WIH Resource Group’s Project Team is selected specifically for our Clients in response to their stated needs. Our Project Team’s extensive experience and qualifications insure optimal performance for all work requested by the Client.

Phoenix / Tucson Wasteshed Radius MarketPhoenix Tucson Region

WIH Resource Group is uniquely qualified to assist Clients in performing Wasteshed Studies for the following reasons:

Wasteshed Studies Experience. The WIH Resource Group Project Team have assisted many clients in the private sector as well as local and regional governments in a diverse range of waste management and recycling consulting services, including wasteshed studies, technical & financial analysis and associated revenues opportunities.

Knowledgeable about the State, Federal and surrounding regions. WIH Resource Group is headquartered in Phoenix and has been providing its diversified services to Clients throughout North America for over a decade. WIH Resource Group is very knowledgeable and familiar with the local waste and recycling operations and programs in all States.

National Leader in Waste, Recycling & Transportation Consulting / Technical Studies. WIH Resource Group is a management consulting firm that specializes in strategic waste management planning, landfills, landfill gas management, collection routing, waste management facility valuations, disposal optimization, waste reduction, logistical analysis, waste diversion, collection vehicle routing, recyclable material recovery facility processing, WastebyRail, transfer station analysis and solid waste systems efficiency analysis.

Proven Waste Management and Recycling Industry Experience. WIH Resource Group’s Team has “real world” operational experience and knowledge from having worked for some of the largest solid waste providers in North America. It’s one of many of our team’s greatest assets. It offers our clients a unique perspective and cost savings opportunity in their own operations.

Leader in Waste Management, Recycling & Transportation Consulting. WIH Resource Group has conducted a wide range of solid waste operational analyses over the past decade and has assisted many clients in improving their waste management, recycling and disposal programs by optimizing their current waste management systems and processes. WIH is currently involved with various projects throughout North America.

• Waste Policy, Economic & Technical Analysis Services. The WIH Resource Group Team has over 100 years combined experience in waste management and the transportation of waste and recyclables, including policy setting, economic assessments / impacts and technical analysis.
About WIH Resource Group

WIH Resource Group, Inc. (WIH) is leading independent provider of environmental, waste management, recycling, transportation, financial and logistical matters. Located in Phoenix, Arizona, WIH provides its clients with fully integrated solutions to day to day business challenges, solid waste, recycling and disposal issues, as well as transportation and logistical challenges. WIH offers Clients creative solutions to solve complex business issues and related matters for government municipalities, industrial companies, environmental, engineering firms, non-profits and commercial customers alike.
WIH Staff takes our Client relationships seriously and strive to exceed our client’s individual expectations and stated needs. We look to establish long term relationships with our clients, ones where we are called on regularly to assist our clients in developing viable and sustainable solutions.

The key factor that differentiates WIH Resource Group from other solid waste consulting firms is that we offer our clients operational management experience and logistical expertise from having worked in the solid waste (refuse) and recycling industries in all lines of business including: collection vehicle routing, solid waste collections, recycling, transfer station, landfill operations, operational optimization studies, rate/policy making and environmental compliance.

WIH offers its clients creative solutions to assist them in solving their complex challenges and attaining their strategic internal goals. WIH’s clients include government municipalities, large industrial companies, environmental and engineering firms, solid waste companies (collections, MRF and landfills), as well as commercial customers. WIH Resource Group is a 100% employee-owned company and therefore provides its Clients the type of attention and commitment they would expect from the company owner.

The firm combines passion for its work with industry expertise and innovative analytics to produce compelling results throughout the entire project life cycle, from analysis and design through implementation and improvement.
An aspect of our business services that our firm is particularly proud of is the number of repeat clients. WIH regularly provides follow-up or expansion-related consulting work for clients after the completion of the original project work.

To learn more about WIH Resource Group, Inc., please visit our website at www.wihrg.com

Wasteshed Market Radius Studies – Geographical Market Focus
WIH Resource Group’s Wasteshed Market Radius Studies & Reports capture all waste disposal operations within a given market. They provide you with analysis of the major players by market share; show you historical trends in pricing, waste disposal volume and disposal capacity specific to the geographic area included in the radius of the study.

Detailed Data on all Public and Private Players
Our report will include a detailed listing of all landfills, transfer stations, waste-to-energy plants, materials recovery facilities, construction & demolition facilities, composting facilities and others operating within an agreed upon mileage radius of a particular origin point. A spreadsheet and map depict each facility and provides details such as the name, location, size of the facility, the daily volume and price charged for each type of waste accepted, days and hours of operation, transportation access (rail, road and waterway), distance from the center of the study area, capacity, the names, addresses and phone numbers of the owner and operator, and much more.

Formatted to Help You Understand the Wasteshed Market
The detailed data in the report, spreadsheets and map, is provided in Adobe Acrobat (*.pdf) format that can also be provided in hardcopy.

Historical pricing and volume and capacity data for each facility
WIH Resource Group and its partner researchers have surveyed the industry since 1991 and consequently can provide very detailed historical data on each facility, including those that have subsequently closed, going back that far in time. The historical data on pricing, volume and capacity give you valuable insight into how the local market is trending, how the market share among each of the players is changing, and the extent of all those changes over time.

Waste Generation, Recovery, Net Export and Disposal within the Market Study Area
Clients have the option to add an analysis of local market characteristics. The total volume of waste and recyclables generated within the study area are estimated using the latest Census Bureau statistics and known per capita discard rates. The volume of waste moving through recycling facilities is combined with local state recovery rates to estimate total recycling for the study area. When subtracted from waste generation, we have post-recovery waste volume which we compare with volumes going into local landfills and waste-to-energy plants to determine how much locally generated waste is either being exported to other regions or how much waste is being imported from other regions.

Market Dynamics
WIH’s Wasteshed Study and Radius Report gives you thorough understanding of the market, the players, the dynamics, average pricing, waste generation, recovery, and disposal particular to the area. Each facility profile is organized by location within the radius, its current known information and the type of facility to make it quickly accessible and useful.

Market Trends
Historical data on pricing, volumes and capacity are also available and can be added to reports to show the evolution and dynamics of the market over time.

Transportation Cost Analysis
WIH Resource Group also provides additional services relative to Wasteshed Market studies such as developing transportation cost estimates for transporting waste from specific locations, as requested for an additional cost. Transportation cost estimates can be developed for truck, railroad and barging (as appropriate) of wastes and recyclables from origin locations to either real or hypothetical destinations to utilize to compare costs to existing market transport and disposal scenarios.

Relevant Project Experience
The following is a summary of WIH Resource Group’s relevant projects for Clients for your review and consideration. It is a partial and representative project list that indicates the broad range of consulting services that we provide to our Clients.

  • City of Los Angeles, CA Proposal Development for Waste Collections RFP
  • Hunt Development Group – Phoenix, AZ Phoenix – Tucson Regional Wasteshed Study
  • DTE Energy – Sacramento, CA Sacramento Regional Wasteshed Study
  • WBH Generating – Tulsa, OK Tulsa OK Regional Wasteshed Study
  • Gregory Canyon Limited – San Diego, Ca San Diego County Regional Wasteshed Study
  • Silver Bar Mine Regional Landfill – Phoenix, AZ Disposal Proposal Development for Cities for Waste Disposal
  • Tucson Recycling and Waste Services – Tucson, AZ Landfill / Transfer Station Privatization Proposal for Pinal County
  • Contra Costa Solid Waste Authority – Walnut Creek, CA Residential Waste & Recycling Satisfaction Polling & Surveying
  • City of Calgary Alberta Canada Waste & Recycling Collections Programs Analysis
  • City of Phoenix, AZ Waste & Recycling Collections Routing and Redistricting
  • City of Los Angeles, CA Waste & Recycling Collection Franchise RFP and Evaluation
  • Private Client – Broward County, FL Transfer Stations and Landfill Valuation Assessment
  • City of Walla Walla, WA Landfill Valuation and Rate Assessment
  • City of Mesa, AZ Refuse Fleet Alternative Fuel Conversion Feasibility Study
  • City of Phoenix, AZ Recycling Collection Vehicle Routing & Services Study
  • City of Coolidge, AZ Waste Operations Performance Assessment – Phase 1
  • City of Tucson, AZ Refuse Collection Fleet Alternative Fuels Feasibility Study
  • Apache County, AZ Waste and Recycling Collection & Processing Study
  • City of Seattle, WA Wastebyrail Feasibility Study
  • King County, WA Recycling Materials Recovery Feasibility Study
  • Metro Regional Government (Portland, OR) Waste & Recyclables Transportation Procurement
  • City of Walla Walla, WA Landfill Waste Disposal & Collections Systems Analysis
  • Escambia County, Florida Waste & Recycling Transfer Station / MRF Valuation
  • City of Tucson, Arizona Recycling Processing & Collection Improvement Study
  • Colville Confederated Tribe, WA Recycling & Solid Waste Management Plan
  • City / Borough of Sitka, Alaska Recycling & Solid Waste Management Program Assessment
  • City of Boise, ID Refuse Collection Fleet Alternative Fuel Study
  • South Utah Valley Solid Waste Dist. – Provo, Utah Solid Waste & Recycling Programs Study
  • Thurston County, WA Waste and Recycling Collections Program Analysis
  • City & Borough of Juneau, Alaska Solid Waste Plan and Disposal Alternatives Analysis

This section provides an overview of the standard applied methodology the WIH Resource Group Project Team employs to accomplish the Client’s objectives as agreed upon with Clients through ongoing communications.

Standard Method of Approach to Wasteshed Studies – WIH Resource Group has used major components of this approach successfully for various other projects and clients, and believes it is well suited for assisting the Client in evaluating the issues in question. We remain open to modifying our approach upon further discussions with Client.

WIH Resource Group is experienced in developing regional Wasteshed Studies and has developed them for a wide range of Client that was looking to site, sell or acquire landfills. The results and findings from the Study WIH develops for you will give you a better understanding of the regional wasteshed and markets, the seemingly largest question for developers of new landfills.  Studies include  regional solid waste and biosolids disposal capacity demand market needs assessment, projected disposal demand capacity for the next 5- 10- and 20- years, market disposal pricing, transportation cost analysis, recycling efforts impacts (i.e. diversion from disposal), survey of existing site life of competing facilities and would in part build off the previous study coupled with current Intel we gather from other sources.

In addition, we develop a cost estimate for the landfill development permitting such as State permit fees, site plan engineering costs, survey/aerial mapping, county zoning fees, State annual fees, outside consultants, meetings, signs, printing, etc. (general estimates), and recurring annual costs to maintain the permits, assuming the landfill is not fully developed for 5-10 years.

The results and findings from the study would provide a greater level of confidence for you concerning the wasteshed, competing landfills’ remaining capacity and current market pricing for disposal to aid you in making an informed decision about the development / sale / acquisition of a landfill.
Our approach is to complete the required elements in a logical, sequential order as agreed upon with the Client to best meet their individual needs.

Pricing for Services
Our approach to pricing is based on a straight time and materials basis and services are charged for at an hourly rate. Final cost of service is dependent on the final Scope of Work as agreed upon with the Client and are quoted in flat inclusive “not to exceed” rate. Cost of services for wasteshed studies range from $18,000 – $35,000 USD, again dependent on the detailed tasks to be performed in the agreed upon Scope of Work with the Client.

For more information, contact Bob Wallace at 480.241.9994 or admin@wihrg.com

Published by: WIH Resource Group, Inc.

WIH Ten Year Celebration Logo

You Tube: Click HERE to visit WIH Resource Group’s You Tube Channel

ABOUT THE FOUNDER of WIH RESOURCE GROUP
Bob Wallace, MBA is the Founder and a Principal of WIH Resource Group, Inc. and has over 27 years of experience in waste and recycling collections programs management, transportation / logistics operations, alternative fuels (CNG, LPG, RNG, LNG & biodiesel), Fleet Management, Operational Performance Assessments (OPAs), Waste-by-Rail programs, recycling / solid waste operations, transfer stations, landfills, planning and development. Mr. Wallace has extensive experience in working with clients in both the private and public sectors. Prior to WIH Resource Group, Mr. Wallace served as the Director of Transportation & Logistics for Waste Management, the largest provider of waste management and recycling services in North America. He can be reached at bwallace@wihresourcegroup.com or 480.241.9994. For more information visit http://www.wihrg.com

Contact WIH Resource Group
For more information, Visit our website by CLICKING HERE and contact us today to see how we can best serve you by phone at 480.241.9994 or by e-mail at admin@wihrg.com

WIH Resource Group’s Diversified Client-Specific Services include:

  • Waste Management Consulting
  • Recycling Programs Optimization
  • Alternative Fuels for Truck Fleets
  • Research & Polling – Customer Satisfaction Surveys
  • Landfill Operations Consulting
  • Business and Assets Appraisals & Valuations
  • Collection, Processing, Transfer & Disposal Procurement
  • M&A Due Diligence
  • Waste to Energy & New Technology Evaluation Environmental Services
  • Expert Testimony/Litigation Support
  • Facility Planning & Design
  • Finance and Economic Analysis
  • Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures
  • Operations & Performance Assessment (OPAs)
  • Planning – Solid Waste, Recycling and Program
  • Program Management & Capital Project Planning
  • Rates, Financial Analyses & Appraisals
  • Rates and Regulatory Support
  • Recycling Program Design
  • Renewables / Clean Energy Technology

Click here to request more information about these services & WIH Resource Group

RELATED LINKS: http://www.wihrg.com

Clean Green Renewable Energy

ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP
WIH Resource Group is a global leader and provider of comprehensive waste management consulting, recycling, transportation / logistical and business solutions, specializing in, among other services, waste management operational performance assessments, financial analysis. transportation / logistics, alternative fuel solutions, solid waste planning, waste and recycling market studies, business development, business valuations, due diligence and Mergers and Acquistions (M&A) transactional support and environmental services.

WIH Resource Group’s experience includes the oversight of operations, maintenance, finance, human resources, business development, sales, safety and environmental compliance while maintaining responsibility for multi-million dollar publicly and privately held assets including: a variety of collection operations, Sub-title D and hazardous and Class II landfills, transfer stations, intermodal facilities, recycling centers, buyback centers, material recovery facilities, vehicle and container maintenance operations, call centers and payment processing operations.

Based in Phoenix, Arizona, the company serves both private companies and public sector Agency clients throughout North America and internationally.  To learn more about WIH Resource Group, Inc. visit http://www.wihrg.com .

For Additional information on WIH Resource Group, Inc. contact:
Bob Wallace, Principal & VP of Client Solutions
WIH Resource Group – Waste Management, Recycling and Logistical Solutions
Email: admin@wihrg.com Phone: 480-241-9994

Website: http://www.wihrg.com
Daily News Blog: http://www.wihresourcegroup.wordpress.com
Follow WIH Resource Group on Twitter: http://twitter.com/wihresource

WIH Resource Group’s White Paper on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fuel Use in Refuse Collection Vehicles Industry is Available for Purchasing:   The entire 65-plus page report and Appendices: $299.00 US Funds – Visa and Mastercard Accepted.

CLICK HERE to Order Your Copy today!

Phone: 480.241.9994 ~ E-mail: admin@wihrg.com

Should you have any questions about this news or general questions about our diversified services, please contact Bob Wallace, Principal & VP of Client Solutions at WIH Resource Group and Waste Savings, Inc. at admin@wihrg.com

Feel free to visit our websites for additional information on our services at: http://www.wihrg.com and our daily blog at https://wihresourcegroup.wordpress.com

Follow Bob Wallace and WIH Resource Group on Twitter: http://twitter.com/wihresource

Be sure to check out Invigorated Solutions, Inc.

  1. Follow @invigorsolution on Twitter
  2. Visit our website: http://www.invigoratedsolutions.com/
  3. Like our Facebook Page
  4. Follow Invigorated Solutions on Tumblr

About Invigorated Solutions

Passionate about life, learning, love and sharing their experiences of life, Bob & Tracy Wallace enjoy sharing their invigorated (energizing) solutions / advice and useful life tips for living life to the fullest on their popular life development blog, “Invigorated Solutions”.  Click HERE to visit our website for more valuable information.

Invigorated Solutions Logo - 3d picture format

%d bloggers like this: