The Story of the Fourth of July


We celebrate American Independence Day on the Fourth of July every year. We think of July 4, 1776, as a day that represents the Declaration of Independence and the birth of the United States of America as an independent nation.

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But July 4, 1776 wasn’t the day that the Continental Congress decided to declare independence (they did that on July 2, 1776).

It wasn’t the day we started the American Revolution either (that had happened back in April 1775).

And it wasn’t the day Thomas Jefferson wrote the first draft of the Declaration of Independence (that was in June 1776). Or the date on which the Declaration was delivered to Great Britain (that didn’t happen until November 1776). Or the date it was signed (that was August 2, 1776).

So what did happen on July 4, 1776?

The Continental Congress approved the final wording of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. They’d been working on it for a couple of days after the draft was submitted on July 2nd and finally agreed on all of the edits and changes.

July 4, 1776, became the date that was included on the Declaration of Independence, and the fancy handwritten copy that was signed in August (the copy now displayed at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.) It’s also the date that was printed on the Dunlap Broadsides, the original printed copies of the Declaration that were circulated throughout the new nation. So when people thought of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 was the date they remembered.

In contrast, we celebrate Constitution Day on September 17th of each year, the anniversary of the date the Constitution was signed, not the anniversary of the date it was approved. If we’d followed this same approach for the Declaration of Independence we’d being celebrating Independence Day on August 2nd of each year, the day the Declaration of Independence was signed!

How did the Fourth of July become a national holiday?For the first 15 or 20 years after the Declaration was written, people didn’t celebrate it much on any date. It was too new and too much else was happening in the young nation. By the 1790s, a time of bitter partisan conflicts, the Declaration had become controversial. One party, the Democratic-Republicans, admired Jefferson and the Declaration. But the other party, the Federalists, thought the Declaration was too French and too anti-British, which went against their current policies.

By 1817, John Adams complained in a letter that America seemed uninterested in its past. But that would soon change.

After the War of 1812, the Federalist party began to come apart and the new parties of the 1820s and 1830s all considered themselves inheritors of Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans. Printed copies of the Declaration began to circulate again, all with the date July 4, 1776, listed at the top. The deaths of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams on July 4, 1826, may even have helped to promote the idea of July 4 as an important date to be celebrated.

Celebrations of the Fourth of July became more common as the years went on and in 1870, almost a hundred years after the Declaration was written, Congress first declared July 4 to be a national holiday as part of a bill to officially recognize several holidays, including Christmas. Further legislation about national holidays, including July 4, was passed in 1939 and 1941.

Regardless, Happy Independence Day America from your friends at WIH Resource Group !!!

U.S. Pocket Constitution Book To learn more about the Constitution — the people, the events, the landmark cases — order a copy of “The U.S. Constitution & Fascinating Facts About It” today!  Call to order: 1-800-887-6661 or order pocket constitution books online.
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ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP

Celebrating a decade in business, WIH Resource Group is a global provider of professional technical and management support services to a broad range of markets, including waste management, recycling, financials, transportation, M&A due diligence and support, alternative fuel fleet conversions, facilities, environmental, energy for private sector business and government clients.

WIH Resource Group is a leader in all of the key markets that it serves. WIH Resource Group provides a blend of global reach, local knowledge, innovation and technical excellence in delivering solutions that create, enhance and sustain the world’s built, natural and social environments.  WIH Resource Group serves clients in more than 175 key markets internationally.

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Issues to Consider for Converting Your Garbage Truck Fleet to Natural Gas


Issues to Consider for Converting Your Garbage Truck Fleet to Natural Gas

ARTICLE OVERVIEW
This article looks at the practical implications for waste management firms and organizations, both private and public sectors, for moving their fleets to alternative fuels including what the options are, as well as some of the challenges and the benefits. This Article provides a high level of key issues to consider and “how to” guide on the subject looking at the practical considerations of making the switch including infrastructure. Many fleet managers and owner/operators are weighing their options when it comes to purchasing natural gas trucks vs. diesel trucks. The big question is “When it comes to diesel or natural gas trucks, which is best for my bottom line?” If fleet managers and owner/operators want to make an informed decision about their business, it is crucial to understand the differences between diesel and natural gas trucks.

A growing number of fleets have already made the switch to natural gas after weighing the benefits and challenges. Private waste companies such as Waste Management and Republic Services are buying thousands of new natural gas vehicles (NGVs), based mainly on the economics of switching. The public sector is lagging behind private haulers in making the switch largely because governments have a harder time securing the capital needed to buy the new equipment, even though there is typically an eventual payoff. However, some cities and other local governments are moving in the same direction as the private sector in order to generate the economic and environmental benefits that are available from compressed natural gas (CNG).

INTRODUCTION
Every day in every major City, Town or Community, one vehicle type, besides school buses, passes through every residential street – the garbage / recycling collection truck. Garbage Trucks (aka as refuse collection vehicles – RCVs) operate daily in various parts of every residential part of every City, collecting garbage, green waste, recyclables, food waste and bulk waste. In most cities or towns, these trucks are still powered by traditional diesel or biodiesel, spewing tons of carcinogens and relatively high amounts of CO2 into our atmosphere and our communities.

Those plumes of diesel exhaust emit dangerous levels of CO2 and in the United States alone approximately 180,000 refuse trucks operate and burn approximately 1.2 billion gallons of diesel fuel a year, releasing almost 27 billion pounds of the greenhouse gas, CO2. Every gallon of diesel fuel burnt emits more than 22 pounds of CO2.

In the U.S., there has been increasing interest in fuelling waste and recycling collection fleets using alternative fuels, primarily either from CNG from the gas-utility grid, or in some cases from landfill or biogas (aka bioCNG) captured at their own waste processing facilities.

CNG OR LNG FUEL
There are two types of natural gas fuels – compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG). Each has its own advantages and disadvantages. CNG is the lower priced of the two fuels and is much more readily available. CNG requires somewhat more payload displacement for equal fuel capacity vs. LNG. However, the disparity had been reduced in recent years due to lighter CNG-storage cylinders and more efficient cylinder configurations on the trucks. The other major challenges with LNG are the fuel delivery, storage and actual vehicle fueling. For the purposes of discussion, this article focuses on CNG, since it is a more readily available both in terms of fueling facilities and vehicles, the abundance of infrastructure, and lower cost.

FUEL ECONOMY & COSTS COMPARED TO DIESEL
Garbage trucks have poor fuel efficiency, typically around 3 miles per gallon, which has been compounded in recent years since the price of diesel has hovered around $4+ per gallon for the last five years.

Currently, CNG is competitively priced with diesel. The price of a diesel gallon equivalent (DGE) of CNG has steadily fallen compared to the price of a gallon of diesel. Although the market price of natural gas was fairly volatile in the previous decade, it has stabilized due to significant increases in discovery and production of natural gas in the U.S. It now appears the price of natural gas has decoupled from the price of oil and has therefore not been as volatile as gasoline and diesel prices.

The expansion of natural gas vehicle (NGV) usage holds the promise of reducing carbon emissions, lessening dependence on foreign oil, and lowering fuel and transportation costs. Viability of natural gas as a transportation fuel has grown partly because the availability of shale gas resources has dramatically expanded and gasoline and diesel prices have spiked. NGVs are also appealing because the high-pressured fuel system is sealed, so very little fugitive emission occurs during fueling and use.

Natural gas trucks can save on fuel costs, but the up-front costs are significant. The most costly element is installing a natural gas fueling station, which depending on its size, can cost several million dollars to permit, design, and construct. An alternative to constructing a new fueling facility is to locate a nearby facility that allows third-party access for fueling. In addition, fleet maintenance facilities have to be upgraded to accommodate CNG fleet maintenance, which requires gas detection as well as improved ventilation to manage possible gas leaks that can be ignited through an inadvertent spark.

The trucks themselves can also cost between $30,000 and $50,000 more than their basic diesel counterparts. However the savings for operating NGVs add up quickly. A DGE of CNG costs less than $1.15 to produce, including the cost of the gas commodity, electrical power for system operation and a maintenance allowance .

LANDFILL BIOGAS (BIOCNG) & RENEWABLE NATURAL GAS (RNG)
Fueling a vehicle with food waste was a concept made famous by the movie Back to the Future in the 1980s. Now, almost 30 years later, what was once a futuristic idea has become a reality. In some places, garbage trucks run on the methane captured from the same landfills where they drop off their payloads.

Biogas, also known as renewable natural gas (RNG), produced at locations such as landfills dairy farms, or anaerobic digesters can supply gas to onsite fueling infrastructure for vehicles such as refuse haulers and dairy trucks. Bacteria breaks down organic waste to produce the methane, which is then filtered and compressed for use in the trucks as a vehicle fuel creating RNG.

There is equipment costs associated with refining RNG for use as vehicle fuel, which includes processes to remove moisture, CO, CO2 and heavier hydrocarbons. Once the RNG has been refined, equipment and installation costs for a fueling station using RNG are similar to those for a fueling station that is connected to a utility pipeline. Increased use of CNG vehicles opens the door to use of RNG. The great news it that RNG is a fully sustainable fuel and with over 30 percent of municipal solid waste (MSW) being food waste and green material, refuse fleets are uniquely positioned to capitalize on a “closed-loop” approach, collecting and processing organic waste to produce RNG for fueling vehicles hauling the same waste.

Producing RNG captures greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agricultural waste and landfills that would otherwise migrate into the atmosphere, turning a costly pollution problem into a revenue-generating product that serves regional climate goals. In fact, RNG has the lowest carbon intensity (CI) values of all fuels rated for California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard. According to the California Energy Commission (CEC), CNG from landfill gas and dairy-digester biogas reduces life-cycle GHG emissions to 85–90 percent below those of diesel fuel, while biomethane derived from high-solids anaerobic digestion can reduce life-cycle GHG emissions to roughly 115 percent below those of diesel. And the operating economics are good, as the cost of the gas commodity is zero, though the processing system does have capital and operating costs.

The use of landfill gas as a vehicle fuel is becoming more common as organizations seek to cut their greenhouse gas emissions and take advantage of the availability and sale of renewable energy. In July 2014, the EPA finalized the Renewable Fuel Pathways II Final Rule to identify additional fuel pathways under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program.

 

BENEFITS OF CNG
The expansion of natural gas vehicles (NGV) usage holds the promise of reducing carbon emissions, lessening dependence on foreign oil, and lowering transportation costs. Viability of natural gas as a transportation fuel has grown partly because the availability of shale gas resources has dramatically expanded and gasoline and diesel prices have spiked. NGVs are also appealing because the high-pressured fuel system is sealed, so little evaporative emission occurs during fueling and use.

MUNICIPALITIES ARE REQUIRING CNG TRUCKS
Cities, Counties and States are increasingly requiring that CNG refuse trucks be used as a condition of granting solid waste and recycling collection contracts. While California jurisdictions have been leading the charge, the town of Smithtown, NY also pioneered this approach in 2006, becoming the first locality outside of California to mandate use of CNG trucks for refuse collection. The approach has since become commonplace elsewhere. Even in communities that do not mandate use of CNG trucks, proposing to use a CNG fleet can improve a firm’s competitive position in the bidding and evaluation process, with the promise of lower contract costs for fuel, reduced emissions and lower noise pollution.

FLEET OPERATIONAL ASSESSMENT
In determining whether it is practical and cost effective to consider converting a garbage truck fleet to CNG, it is necessary to perform the proper due diligence by reviewing the operations and fleet needs as follows:

  • Existing vehicle requirements for conversion to CNG / fleet vehicle-replacement schedules;
  • Typical fuel use per day including travel routes, mileage, stops, capacity by vehicle type;
  • Maintenance capabilities including facilities operational requirements, location, and personnel knowledge and training;
  • Expected growth in services, customers, etc. as related to future vehicle numbers and use; and
  • Proximity to customers with the potential for CNG fueled fleets.
    Feasibility of locating a CNG-fueling facility at the fleet yard, including consideration of adequate space, electrical power, and vehicle circulation.
  • Evaluation of fast-fill (fueling 1-3 NGVs simultaneously within 5-10 minutes, similar to a conventional petrol fueling sequence) vs. time- or slow-fill (fueling the entire fleet simultaneously with individual dispenser hoses installed at NGV-parking spaces, typically over 8-10 hours each night).

The answers to these primary factors are critical in assessing the practicality of converting a fleet to CNG.

FLEET VEHICLES COST – BENEFITS ANALYSIS
In addition to the due diligence collected from the fleet operational assessment, fleet managers should assess the qualitative and quantitative comparisons of using CNG for new RCVs such comparisons to include:

  • Cost of new vehicles;
  • Lead time between vehicle order and delivery;
  • Cost of diesel fuel;
  • Five (5) and ten (10) year spreads on a miles per equivalent gallon basis based on projected supply/demand of fleet use in the US of various fuels;
  • Fuel tank capacity, fueling frequency, and mileage;
  • Expected vehicle performance in terms of productivity, number of stops, starts, unit life, speed, performance, acceleration, vehicle range, etc.;
  • Emissions based on expected use of the fueling options;
  • Cost per mile comparison;
  • Payload capacity impacts;
  • Gross Vehicle Weight, weight difference and impact on route numbers or timing of routes;
  • Noise generation comparison; and
  • Analysis on issues stemming from the mounting of the fuel tanks to the body, specifically addressing:  1. Height restrictions; and 2.Tank serviceability by mechanics and required fall protection.

OPERATIONAL AND FINANCIAL IMPACT ANALYSIS
Conducting a operational and financial impacts analysis includes reviewing personnel (headcount) requirements for repairs, fleet maintenance, and operations of the fleet assuming vehicle replacement schedule for the next five (5) and ten (10) years with CNG vehicles, including the following:

  • Expected service life of the vehicle
  • Routine/scheduled maintenance requirements including timing and materials;
  • Required maintenance including maintenance facility requirements/modifications and personnel;
  • Vehicle inspection requirements (including fuel tanks) and licensing fee comparisons;
  • Cost and availability of replacement parts, including if vehicle fuel type increases in use or is phased out of manufacture;
  • Number and skill level of personnel for maintenance;
  • Initial and ongoing training requirements for service and maintenance personnel;
  • Comparison of cost of in-house maintenance and/or outsourcing maintenance;
  • Modifications to the maintenance garage as needed to make the garage CNG-safe;
  • Initial and ongoing training requirements for mechanics and drivers; and
    Identifying local private sector repair and service facilities and providers.

FUELING FACILITY SITE ANALYSIS
The US Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center website offers a free alternative fueling station locator for finding alternative fueling stations near a specific address or ZIP code or along a route in the United States. It allows users to enter a state to see a station count and specific fueling facility locations (see http://www.afdc.energy.gov/locator/stations/)

In the event a local CNG fueling facility is not available, a fueling facility will need to be designed and constructed. In this scenario, it is important to consider the following as part of the decisions as to where to site the facility:

  • Location of natural gas distribution lines in relation to the planned CNG facility and requirements to adequately serve the compressors;
  • Location of electrical service in relation to the planned CNG facility and the cost and requirements to adequately connect and operate the compressors;
  • Footprint of the locations to house the entire solid waste fleet;
    Footprint of the locations to house required vehicle maintenance structures and the requirements and costs for those maintenance structures/changes to existing structures;
  • Logistical comparison of each with respect to ingress and egress as related to CNG fueling;
  • Operational cost impact including any route modifications required of each CNG refuse trucks based on vehicle fueling requirements;
  • Operational cost impact including any route modifications of all non-CNG refuse trucks including vehicle fueling requirements;
  • Design-engineering and permitting requirements including timing;
    estimated infrastructure costs;
  • Maintenance and operational costs for the station(s) and related equipment;
  • Useful life of major station equipment and estimated replacement cost;
    Consideration of developing a coop or shared-use CNG facility with nearby fleet(s), as well as consideration of the public sale of CNG as a revenue stream;
  • Suitability of time-fill and fast-fill CNG station(s) and/or a combination thereof; and
  • Should procuring for such services be required, estimating the timing for the possible design, permitting, and construction for all locations, including a temporary station (if applicable) needs to be considered.

If a fueling facility is to be designed and constructed, it is necessary to determine a baseline for function and performance for the needed CNG fueling facility, as required to meet the planned use. Once the key design parameters have been determined – i.e. number of fast and/or time-fill dispensers, standard cubic ft. per minute (SCFM) capacity of the compressor system, compressor-redundancy levels etc. – site-specific configurations and conceptual equipment layouts will be prepared that account for variations in gas-supply pressure, total available space, and even shape of the space (perhaps a single duplex skid would fit better than two separate skids at a given site). This would also include assessing cost and operational factors for fast-fill vs. time-fill solutions, such as reduced fueling-labor costs for time fill, verses reduced dispenser costs and improved fuel-use tracking for fast-fill configurations.

Once the equipment configuration and conceptual site layout for two or three candidate locations has been established, that information can be used to prepare preliminary construction-cost estimates for the fueling facility. This needs to include site-specific allowances for ancillary factors, such as paving, fencing, lighting, supply-utility upgrades, and added sound-mitigation requirements.

FUELING FACILITIES LOCATION IMPACTS
In the event a local CNG fueling facility is not available, a fueling facility will need to be designed and constructed. In this scenario, it is important to consider the following as part of the decisions as to the optimal location(s) of permanent fueling station(s). Some of the critical factors that need to be included in the analysis are:

• Permitting, design and construction costs;
• Timing of permitting;
• Selection of a suitable design-consulting firm to prepare engineered drawings and specifications;
• Selection of Equipment;
• Operational and maintenance costs of the station(s);
• Analysis of the long term costs or operational benefits;
• Operational impact (if any) on the routing of the RCVs.

Optimal projects should assume a RCV fleet-replacement schedule for the next five (5) and ten (10) years is accomplished with CNG vehicles.

Optimal fueling facility locations should also consider opportunities to provide service to the public and/or commercial customer(s) whose fleets may be served by a conveniently sited station(s). With a production cost of less than $1.15 per DGE and a typical sale-price range of $2.00 to $2.90 per DGE, a reasonable margin per DGE is available.

It is also important to note that it may be necessary to determine if a temporary (or mobile) fueling facility will be required, and if so, the costs, operational requirements, timing of completion, location, and the vehicle fueling capacity of the temporary station.

GRANT AND FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES
It is important to conduct research and identify funding and grant opportunities as well as any tax or government rebates or credits for which a specific fleet may qualify. Various incentives may be available in the forms of tax credits, grants, rebates and voucher-based vehicle price buy-downs which can further accelerate payback period for fleet conversions.

Along with Federal incentives, several states such as California, Colorado, Florida, Texas and Indiana offer strong incentive programs for purchasing vehicles that run on CNG. Other states offer incentives as well, and some states offer incentives for building CNG fueling infrastructure.

The federal government has for several years provided for an excise tax credit of 50 cents per gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) of CNG used as a transportation fuel to be claimed on tax filings, as well as a tax credit of up to $30,000 of the cost of building CNG fueling infrastructure. The federal tax credits expired on the last day of 2014; however there is a high likelihood that during its current session, Congress will renew these tax credits retroactive to the first of January 2015. Depending on the type and amount of incentives received, ROIs for fleet conversions to CNG RCVs can be reduced to just two or three years. A listing of incentives available for deploying CNG trucks can be found at http://www.afdc.energy.gov/laws and at ngvamerica.org/government-policy/federal-incentives/.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
The recent discoveries of massive natural-gas reserves in the U.S. are creating greater scales of economy in support of long-term planning and fleet conversions to NGVs. NGVs are helping the U.S. and Canada to break free of dependence on foreign oil. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, NGVs typically emit 25 percent less greenhouse gases than diesel-powered vehicles.

In addition, natural gas is lower priced than diesel, approximately $1.50 to $2.50 less per gasoline gallon equivalent (DGE), depending on whether the CNG is purchased at a retail location or is produced at a fleet’s own facility. About 50 percent of new garbage trucks and 25 percent of new buses in the U.S. operate on natural gas. In several cities, all RCVs and buses are now running on natural gas, either in city collection fleets or contracted private-sector fleets.

While diesel prices have declined in recent months, fleet owners and managers need to take a long-term view about petroleum costs and fleet conversions to CNG. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has projected that natural gas prices will remain significantly lower than the price of petroleum for at least the next two decades and that natural gas prices will exhibit only one-third the price volatility of diesel fuel.

Fleet standardization in terms of vehicle type, manufacturer, model, chassis, body and other specifications is an excellent way to gain greater productivity out of fleet operators, fleet maintenance, reducing spare parts inventory, and increased utilization the fleet.

If you are considering the switch to a natural gas fleet, work with experienced experts such as WIH Resource Group to assist you in deciding what is best for your business.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC)http://www.afdc.energy.gov/ – The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) is a comprehensive clearinghouse of information about advanced transportation technologies. The AFDC offers transportation decision makers unbiased information, data, and tools related to the deployment of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles.

Alternative Fuels Vehicles Group on Linked Inhttp://goo.gl/SvYYTN – The Alternative Fuel Vehicles (AFV) Group on Linked In was created as a catalyst for sharing information on AFVs and promoting the use of AFVs and fleet conversions. The AFV Group was founded and is sponsored by WIH Resource Group (http://www.wihrg.com). The AFV welcomes new members and encourages member participation in the Alternative Fuel Vehicles Group (AFV) discussions.

California Natural Gas Vehicle Partnershiphttp://www.cngvp.org/ – The California Natural Gas Vehicle Partnership is an alliance of air quality, transportation and energy agencies; vehicle and engine manufacturers; fuel providers; transit and refuse hauler associations; and others interested in supporting and increasing deployment of natural gas vehicles throughout California. The website provides additional NGV facts, general industry news and success stories.

CNG Nowhttp://www.cngnow.com/ – The official Pickens Plan site promotes natural gas for transportation and provides information on vehicles, fueling and energy news.

NGVAmericahttp://www.ngvamerica.org/ – This national trade association promotes development of the U.S. market for natural gas vehicles, and advocates for supportive federal policies, publishes a weekly newsletter and provides fact sheets and other resources for NGVs and CNG facilities.

NGV Global – http://www.ngvglobal.com/ – The International Association for Natural Gas Vehicles provides news and information on the industry from around the world.

Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forumhttp://goo.gl/RZAgSA – Run by the Clean Vehicle Education Foundation and supported by the Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission, the NGVTF aims to advance natural gas vehicle and infrastructure technology and deployment.

Natural Gas Vehicle Institutehttp://www.ngvi.com/ – The Natural Gas Vehicle Institute provides training and consulting to address a full range of natural gas vehicle and fueling needs.

CALSTARThttp://www.calstart.org/ – The nonprofit CALSTART works with the public and private sectors to develop advanced transportation technologies and help clean transportation companies succeed.

Energy Information Administrationhttp://www.eia.gov/naturalgas/ – Statistics on and analysis of natural gas supply, production and use from the U.S. Department of Energy.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS
Bob Wallace, MBA is the Founder and a Principal of WIH Resource Group, Inc. and has over 27 years of experience in waste and recycling collections programs management, transportation / logistics operations, alternative fuels (CNG, LPG, RNG, LNG & biodiesel), Fleet Management, Operational Performance Assessments (OPAs), Waste-by-Rail programs, recycling / solid waste operations, transfer stations, landfills, planning and development. Mr. Wallace has extensive experience in working with clients in both the private and public sectors. Prior to WIH Resource Group, Mr. Wallace served as the Director of Transportation & Logistics for Waste Management, the largest provider of waste management and recycling services in North America. He can be reached at bwallace@wihresourcegroup.com or 480.241.9994. For more information visit http://www.wihrg.com

Reb Guthrie is a Principal and co-founder of Fuel Solutions Inc. He has managed most of the projects performed by the company since its inception 1n 1994, including the assessment, specification, development and installation of more than 130 CNG fueling stations for municipalities, transit authorities, counties, school districts and federal agencies throughout the U.S. Reb’s recent project-management work includes providing lead technical consulting to the Los Angeles County MTA in the procurement of a $6.2 million fast-fill CNG facility at Division 13 in downtown Los Angeles, and the design and construction supervision of a $2.1 million fast- and time-fill fueling facility for the City of Denver Sanitation Department. He has also been certified by the NGV Institute and Southern California Gas Company as an NGV Fueling Facility Planner. Reb has a BS in Economics from the College of Business at Arizona State University.

Published & Written by: WIH Resource Group, Inc.

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WIH Resource Group’s Diversified Client-Specific Services include:

  • Waste Management Consulting
  • Recycling Programs Optimization
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  • Landfill Operations Consulting
  • Business and Assets Appraisals & Valuations
  • Collection, Processing, Transfer & Disposal Procurement
  • M&A Due Diligence
  • Waste to Energy & New Technology Evaluation Environmental Services
  • Expert Testimony/Litigation Support
  • Facility Planning & Design
  • Finance and Economic Analysis
  • Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures
  • Operations & Performance Assessment (OPAs)
  • Planning – Solid Waste, Recycling and Program
  • Program Management & Capital Project Planning
  • Rates, Financial Analyses & Appraisals
  • Rates and Regulatory Support
  • Recycling Program Design
  • Renewables / Clean Energy Technology

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ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP
WIH Resource Group is a global leader and provider of comprehensive waste management consulting, recycling, transportation / logistical and business solutions, specializing in, among other services, waste management operational performance assessments, financial analysis. transportation / logistics, alternative fuel solutions, solid waste planning, waste and recycling market studies, business development, business valuations, due diligence and Mergers and Acquistions (M&A) transactional support and environmental services.

WIH Resource Group’s experience includes the oversight of operations, maintenance, finance, human resources, business development, sales, safety and environmental compliance while maintaining responsibility for multi-million dollar publicly and privately held assets including: a variety of collection operations, Sub-title D and hazardous and Class II landfills, transfer stations, intermodal facilities, recycling centers, buyback centers, material recovery facilities, vehicle and container maintenance operations, call centers and payment processing operations.

Based in Phoenix, Arizona, the company serves both private companies and public sector Agency clients throughout North America and internationally.  To learn more about WIH Resource Group, Inc. visit http://www.wihrg.com .

For Additional information on WIH Resource Group, Inc. contact:
Bob Wallace, Principal & VP of Client Solutions
WIH Resource Group – Waste Management, Recycling and Logistical Solutions
Email: admin@wihrg.com Phone: 480-241-9994

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Passionate about life, learning, love and sharing their experiences of life, Bob & Tracy Wallace enjoy sharing their invigorated (energizing) solutions / advice and useful life tips for living life to the fullest on their popular life development blog, “Invigorated Solutions”.  Click HERE to visit our website for more valuable information.

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Planning to Green your Fleet? Look Before You Leap


Today, an increasing number of fleets are planning to go green. But, what really constitutes “green”? Some fleet managers believe that, in order to be green, the fleet must operate hybrids, pure electrics, or use a clean alternative fuel. All of these alternatives can, indeed, be environmentally friendly; however, in reality, any initiative that significantly reduces a fleet’s environmental impact can be considered green. For example, a conventional fleet that reduces fuel consumption by 35 percent through better specifications and improved utilization is, potentially, just as green as a fleet that converted to hybrids or an alternative fuel.

Looking to Green Your Fleet?  Look no further, WIH Resource Group has your solutions!  http://www.wihrg.com

Looking to Green Your Fleet? Look no further, WIH Resource Group has your solutions! http://www.wihrg.com

Why Go Green?

There are many different ways to reduce a fleet’s environmental impact, and the reasons for doing so are numerous.

But, if a fleet is considering adopting a green program, it’s important to first accurately define why it is considering such a big leap. Once that is determined, fleet leadership must establish a broad performance objective. This will help determine the steps fleet will take to become green and establish a means to measure the program’s success.

While there may be multiple objectives, they will likely fall into one or more of the following general categories:

● Enhance the company’s public image.
● Minimize fuel costs.
● Lower overall operating costs.
● Minimize CO2 emissions.
● Eliminate use of conventional, hydrocarbon fuels.
● Utilize a fuel that will be readily available in the fleet’s area of operation.
● Fulfill government mandates.

One of the first issues that may be encountered during the process of greening a fleet involves government mandates. The government may have requirements as to how the greening process is going to proceed.

What Are the Options?

There are numerous alternatives when it comes to greening a fleet, including changing how the fleet operates, increasing vehicle efficiency, adopting electric or hybrid vehicles, using drop-in liquid alternative fuels or switching to gaseous alternative fuels, or exotics (e.g., hydrogen or dimethyl ether aka DME).

Often, the alternatives can be combined. For example, a fleet can convert to an alternative fuel and make management changes to improve fleet utilization. The real question is: Which alternative should be used?

To find the best solution, a fleet manager should start by defining drive and duty cycles. The fleet may also be constrained by regulations, availability, and pricing of alternative fuels; funding; and operating considerations. This last issue is very important for utility fleets that may have to respond to emergency situations (e.g., storms or floods) outside of normal operating areas.

Drive Cycles & Duty Cycles

The terms “drive cycle” and “duty cycle” are often used interchangeably, but they actually measure two different aspects of vehicle utilization. A drive cycle defines how a vehicle is used, while a duty cycle defines how much it is being used.

A drive cycle typically measures factors such as vehicle speed, starts and stops over a given time period, idle time (incidental and extended), and engine off time. It may also incorporate data on power export (PTO operation, etc.). This information is normally graphed showing vehicle speed over time. The chart above defines an urban dynamometer test drive cycle, but is typical of how a drive cycle graph will look.

Duty cycles measure how much a vehicle is used. The primary factors tracked include frequency and length of use, utilization cycles per measurement period, distance driven per measurement cycle, on-road versus off-road use, load profile, and total vehicle lifecycle. There are numerous ways to track a drive cycle, such as the use of a data logger, downloading information from the CANbus, or by utilizing a telematics system.

Duty cycle data typically comes from a combination of data logging and historical data, but experience shows that perceived duty cycles and actual duty cycles are not always the same, so it is important to ensure accurate usage data.

A drive cycle typically measures factors such as vehicle speed, starts and stops over a given time period, idle time (incidental and extended), and engine off time. SOURCE: NTEA
A drive cycle typically measures factors such as vehicle speed, starts and stops over a given time period, idle time (incidental and extended), and engine off time. SOURCE: NTEA

Putting it all Together

Once the drive and duty cycles for a specific application have been defined, it becomes much easier to pick the right alternatives. Just remember that drive and duty cycles frequently vary by vehicle type, operating environment, specific application, and even the time of year.

Other factors — such as overall objectives, mandates, financial considerations, and application constraints — may also impact the final selection.

Ultimately, there is no single right answer — a fleet manager must make an educated decision for each situation. The selections must be consistent with operational requirements, such as: range requirements, availability of alternative fuels, charging cycles and usable range for electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles (PHEVs), payload factors, vehicle tare weight, usable cargo space, and vehicle utilization flexibility.

Websites of such organizations as the Green Truck Association (www.greentruckassociation.com) and green technology conferences, such as the annual Green Truck Summit, which is produced by the NTEA and CALSTART, can be excellent resources to help with the selection of viable green alternatives.

Even if a vehicle drive cycle is a perfect match for a specific green alternative, the associated duty cycle and investment constraints may preclude its use.

For example, with its drive cycle (low mileage and speeds, frequent stops, and high idle times), an inner-city truck appears to be the perfect application for a hybrid or electric vehicle. However, both options typically represent a high initial investment, so there are financial considerations.

In addition, an analysis of the application’s duty cycle may show the vehicle will never drive enough miles during its life to pay back the investment. Conversely, the high idle time indicated by the drive cycle analysis may make an excellent case for the installation of a lower cost idle management system. In a related scenario, if a vehicle is utilized for two shifts a day, the use of an electric vehicle may be contradicted by the amount of dwell time needed to recharge the batteries between shifts.

When evaluating alternatives, don’t overlook the benefits of making relatively simple changes to fleet vehicles. In many cases, efficiency increases of 30 percent or more are attainable through the use of technologies such as: driver behavior modification, optimized powertrains, electrification of accessory loads and power export (electric PTOs), aerodynamics, weight reduction, reduced rolling resistance, idle management, and telematics.

Hidden Costs

Be careful not to overlook hidden infrastructure costs when evaluating advanced green alternatives. In almost all cases, it will be necessary to factor in costs for new shop equipment and technician training. In addition, specific alternatives have their own associated costs. Examples when dealing with gaseous fuels include, but are not limited to: modification of shops and parking facilities to meet fire codes; heating and ventilation modifications; lighting and other wiring modifications; upgrades to electrical systems for operation of a compressor station; type and size of compressor station needed; and potential for incurring demand billing for electrical service.

Likewise, when considering electric vehicles, don’t overlook:

● Upgrades to electrical systems (charging requirements).
● Required charge level (1, 2, or 3).
● Demand billing considerations.

Regardless of why a fleet elects to go green, there should be some means to measure success. In the end, if original goals have been met, the fleet is financially viable, and operations have not been negatively impacted, it may be fairly safe to say the program is a success. However, don’t forget, more can always be done.

About the Author
Bob Johnson is director of fleet relations for the NTEA – The Association for the Work Truck Industry. To learn more about the organization and its annual Work Truck Show, visit www.ntea.com/worktruckshow.

SOURCE: WIH Resource Group & Work Truck Magazine

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WIH Resource Group’s Diversified Client-Specific Services include:

  • Waste Management Consulting
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  • Business and Assets Appraisals & Valuations
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  • M&A Due Diligence
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  • Operations & Performance Assessment (OPAs)
  • Planning – Solid Waste, Recycling and Program
  • Program Management & Capital Project Planning
  • Rates, Financial Analyses & Appraisals
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ABOUT WIH RESOURCE GROUP
WIH Resource Group is a global leader and provider of comprehensive waste management consulting, recycling, transportation / logistical and business solutions, specializing in, among other services, waste management operational performance assessments, financial analysis. transportation / logistics, alternative fuel solutions, solid waste planning, waste and recycling market studies, business development, business valuations, due diligence and Mergers and Acquistions (M&A) transactional support and environmental services.

WIH Resource Group’s experience includes the oversight of operations, maintenance, finance, human resources, business development, sales, safety and environmental compliance while maintaining responsibility for multi-million dollar publicly and privately held assets including: a variety of collection operations, Sub-title D and hazardous and Class II landfills, transfer stations, intermodal facilities, recycling centers, buyback centers, material recovery facilities, vehicle and container maintenance operations, call centers and payment processing operations.

Based in Phoenix, Arizona, the company serves both private companies and public sector Agency clients throughout North America and internationally.  To learn more about WIH Resource Group, Inc. visit http://www.wihrg.com .

For Additional information on WIH Resource Group, Inc. contact:
Bob Wallace, Principal & VP of Client Solutions
WIH Resource Group – Waste Management, Recycling and Logistical Solutions
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Alternative Fuels In Refuse Collection Vehicles (CNG and LNG) – WIH Resource Group


About the White Paper

The White Paper is developed by WIH Resource Group (WIH) and was created from industry research and analysis of the current use of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) in refuse (municipal solid waste – MSW) collection vehicles by both public sector agencies and private sector service providers throughout the United States.  The waste management industry’s interest in this information is to assess the potential for utilizing CNG fueled refuse collection vehicles in their own organizations or subcontracted solid waste and recycling collection vehicles and operations. 

CNG Garbage Truck

CNG Fueled Refuse Collection Truck

 The surveys and interviews conducted by WIH’s Staff with various cities and other private sector companies that currently utilize and operate CNG fleets, centered on securing industry experience, data and knowledge on the following key items of interest to the waste management industry, both public and private sectors:

  •  CNG Engine reliability;
  • Optimal CNG engine type (manufacturer)
  • Average age of CNG fueled fleets & life expectancy of CNG fueled fleets;
  • Average R&M and operational costs of CNG fueled fleets;
  • Determination of the overall reliability of CNG fueling systems;
  • Assessment of the legal payload impacts, i.e. contrasting standard diesel collection vehicle payloads to that of CNG fueled trucks (CNG fueled vehicles have heavier tare weights due to the need for larger fuel tanks), including transportation routing cost impacts to and from disposal sites;
  • Review of the available grant funding from the State, EPA and Federal agencies to assist in capital costs of fleet acquisition and ongoing operating costs;
  • Assessment of the effects of CNG fuels and fueling in cold winter climates and elevation changes which require full trucks to transport up inclines.

 Summary of Table of Contents

The White Paper is organized into five sections, plus Appendices.  The sections of the White Paper are listed below.

n   Section 1 – Introduction and Project Approach

n   Section 2 – Refuse Collection Vehicles

n   Section 3 – Industry Research and Interviews

n   Section 4 – Natural Gas and Compressed Natural Gas

n   Section 5 – Evaluation of Key Issues and Recommendations

n   Appendices

 White Paper Highlights by Section

 Section One

WIH Resource Group

WIH Resource Group

In August 2008, a U.S. City’s Public Works Department, Solid Waste Programs Division, retained the services of WIH Resource Group (WIH) to assist their jurisdiction in researching the use of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fuel as an alternative to traditional diesel fuel in its contracted residential refuse and recycling collection vehicles currently operated under contract by private third party solid waste and recycling collections service provider.

 Section Two

In the United States approximately 155,000 refuse trucks operate and burn approximately 1.2 billion gallons of diesel fuel a year, releasing almost 27 billion pounds of the greenhouse gas, CO2. Every gallon of diesel fuel burnt emits more than 22 pounds of CO2. In addition to contributing to global climate change, diesel-fueled trash trucks are one of the most concentrated sources of health-threatening air pollution in virtually all cities. 

 Section Three

CNG is natural gas that has been compressed into a high-pressure container for transportation. Since the 1960s, CNG has become a vehicle fuel alternative to oil-based gasoline and diesel fuel. The International Association for Natural Gas Vehicles estimates that more than one million vehicles worldwide operate on CNG.

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fuel Storage Cylinders

In the United States more than 1,300 CNG refueling stations are available. The total includes public service stations and private depot-based refueling stations intended to serve fleets.  Several companies provide CNG/LNG refueling infrastructure to fleets on a component or turnkey basis.

Section Four

 The WIH Resource Group project team conducted a series of interviews and meetings with individuals that are subject matter experts (SMEs) from public agencies, private sector solid waste collection companies and CNG industry suppliers of both fuel and engines.

 The average price of natural gas is up to $1.00 less per diesel gallon equivalent (DGE) and refuse truck operators can get fixed-price, multi-year natural gas fueling contracts from CNG and NG fuel suppliers like Clean Energy.

 The use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel helps reduce U.S. dependence on foreign crude oil. In 2005, 64% of the crude oil used in the United States was imported from foreign sources other than Canada. By comparison, in 2005, an estimated 97% of the natural gas used in the United States was supplied from the United States and Canada, making it less vulnerable to foreign supply disruption and price volatility.

 Prior to the interviews, each organization was provided a list of the issues that it would be asked about in its interview. A list of the issues that were discussed during these interviews is provided in Table 1.

Table 1 – Private Sector Companies and Public Agencies Interview Questions

Issue
1. CNG Engine Reliability Compared to Diesel Engines
2. Optimal Engine Manufacturer
3. Average Age of CNG & Life Expectancy
4. Average R&M and operational costs of CNG fueled fleets
5. Overall Reliability of CNG Fueling Systems
6. Legal Payload Impacts – CNG verses Diesel-powered vehicles
7. Grant Funding and Tax incentives
8. Effects of CNG fuels and fueling in cold weather climates and elevation changes

Section Five

CNG Fueled Garbage Truck at the Golden Gate Bridge

The CNG market is more stable than the gasoline market. CNG generally costs 15 to 40 percent less than gasoline or diesel. CNG requires more frequent refueling, however, because it contains only about a quarter of the energy by volume of gasoline. In addition, CNG vehicles cost between $1,500 and $3,500 annually more than their diesel-powered counterparts. This is primarily due to the higher cost of the fuel cylinders. As the popularity and production of CNG fuel refuse collection vehicles continues to increases, CNG vehicle costs are decreasing.

Once new natural gas trucks are in service, their operators stand to save money. Not only has the price of natural gas been significantly lower than that of diesel fuel for many years (approximately $.50 per diesel gallon equivalent (DGE) cheaper), but an excise tax credit available under the Energy Policy Act (2005) has made this fuel an even better bargain. Estimated savings for new 20 compressed natural gas trucks for the City’s Solid Waste Division is contemplating purchasing, may produce fuel savings of more than $157,894 per year over diesel fuel.

 Appendices

Appendix A – Public and Private Sector Interviews

Appendix B – Federal Tax Credit Fact Sheet

Appendix C – Cummins Westport, Inc. ISL-G Engine Specifications

Appendix D – Natural Gas Vehicles in the World 2007

Appendix E – U.S. Natural Gas Distribution Pipeline Network

Appendix F – Alternative Fuel Resources

Appendix G – Cummins Westport Press Release – Tax Credits

Bob Wallace

About The Author:  Bob Wallace, Principal and Vice President of Client Solutions, WIH Resource Group, Inc. (WIH) and Waste Savings, Inc. (WSI), former Boardmember SWANA ~ State of Arizona Chapter (Solid Waste Association of North America), APWA (American Public Works) ~ National Solid Waste Rate Setting Advisory Committee and Member of WASTEC (Waste Equipment Technology Association) NSWMA ~ Phoenix, Arizona USA. (bwallace@wihresourcegroup.com).

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fuel Use in Refuse Collection Vehicles Industry White Paper
Available for Purchasing:  Entire 50-plus page report and Appendices:

$299.00 US Funds – Visa and Mastercard Accepted.

 Order Your Copy today!

Phone:  480.241.9994 ~ E-mail:  admin@wihrg.com

Source:  WIH Resource Group

Should you have any questions about this news or general questions about our diversified services, please contact Bob Wallace, Principal & VP of Client Solutions at WIH Resource Group and Waste Savings, Inc. at admin@wihrg.com

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French Get Nude For Climate Change


GreenPeace is serious about climate change. And they know that one of the best—or maybe easiest—ways to bring attention to a cause is to put naked people on it. Naked people + social cause = media attention. Seriously, would I even be blogging about this if GreenPeace had put out some pastoral pictures of wineries in the south of France with the headline “Save Our Vintners”? (The answer is no.)

713 hardy French men and women stripped down to send a message about climate change. They posed nude in French vineyards to warn the world about the impact of global warming on the French wine industry.

In Burgundy, the heart of the French vineyards, on a sunny day ( luckily), Spencer Tunick posed the happy participants in 4 different poses; one with women alone, one with men alone and two more in different vineyards. Organised with Greenpeace, it’s all part of the campaign to urge political leaders to take action in the lead up to the U.N.’s Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in December.

Tunick has been organising these mass nude art pieces for more than 15 years and all over the world. In 2007 he worked with Greenpeace to do one in -10 degree weather, with six hundred dedicated Swiss posing nude on a melting glacier (the Aletsch) in Switzerland. This was done to draw attention to global warming and the shrinking glaciers, which are predicted to disappear by 2080.

Source:  Chelsea Green & WIH Resource Group

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Tracking Trash – MIT Project Aims to Raise Awareness of How Garbage Impacts the Environment


What if we knew exactly where our trash was going and how much energy it took to make it disappear? Would it make us think twice about buying bottled water or “disposable” razors?

A team of MIT researchers today announced a major project called Trash Track, which aims to get people thinking about what they throw away. Trash Track relies on the development of special electronic tags that will track different types of waste on their journey through the disposal systems of New York and Seattle. The project will monitor the patterns and costs of urban disposal and create awareness of the impact of trash on our environment – revealing the last journey of our everyday objects.

“Trash is one of today’s most pressing issues – both directly and as a reflection of our attitudes and behaviors,” says Professor Carlo Ratti, head of the MIT SENSEable City lab. “Our project aims to reveal the disposal process of our everyday objects, as well as to highlight potential inefficiencies in today’s recycling and sanitation systems. The project could be considered the urban equivalent of nuclear medicine – when a tracer is injected and followed through the human body.

“The study of what we could call the ‘removal chain’ is becoming as important as that of the supply chain,” the lab’s associate director, Assaf Biderman, explains. “Trash Track aims to make the removal chain more transparent. We hope that the project will promote behavioral change and encourage people to make more sustainable decisions about what they consume and how it affects the world around them.”

Trash Track will enlist volunteers in two target cities – New York and Seattle – who will allow pieces of their trash to be electronically tagged with special wireless location markers, or “trash tags.” Thousands of these markers, attached to a waste sample representative of the city’s overall consumption, will calculate their location through triangulation and report it to a central server, where the data will be analyzed and processed in real time. The public will be able to view the migration patterns of the trash online, as well as in an exhibit at the Architectural League in New York City and in the Seattle Public Library, starting in September 2009.

Trash Track was initially inspired by the Green NYC Initiative, the goal of which is to increase the rate of waste recycling in New York to almost 100 percent by 2030. Currently, only about 30 percent of the city’s waste is diverted from landfills for recycling. “We hope that Trash Track will also point the way to a possible urban future: that of a system where, thanks to the pervasive usage of smart tags, 100 percent recycling could become a reality,” says project leader, Musstanser Tinauli.

“Carlo Ratti and his team have come up with a visionary project to help people take ownership of their pollution,” says Roger Highfield, editor of New Scientist magazine, which will be helping to deploy a third batch of tags in London, U.K. “It’s all too easy to throw something in the garbage and wash your hands of it if you don’t know what effect you are directly having on the environment.”

With this project, the MIT SENSEable City Laboratory seeks to couple high-tech, rapidly evolving technology with an everyday human activity: trash disposal. Trash Track builds on some of the lab’s previous projects – including Real Time Rome and the New York Talk Exchange – gathering, assessing and analyzing real-time data to improve urban functionality.

The Trash Track team at the SENSEable City Lab is composed of Carlo Ratti, Assaf Biderman, Rex Britter, Stephen Miles, Musstanser Tinauli, E. Roon Kang, Alan Anderson, Avid Boustani, Natalia Duque Ciceri, Lorenzo Davolli, Jennifer Dunnam, Samantha Earl, Lewis Girod, Srabjit Kaur, Armin Linke, Eugenio Morello, Sarah Neilson, Giovanni de Niederhausern, Jill Passano, Renato Rinaldi, Francisca Rojas, Louis Sirota and Malima Wolf.

Source: MIT, The Trash Track team at the SENSEable City Lab and WIH Resource Group

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Waste Coalition Lawsuit Seeks to Overturn Unconstitutional Cap on Solano County Trash Imports


A coalition of more than twenty waste hauling and recycling companies filed a lawsuit in federal court today seeking to declare invalid a local Solano County ballot initiative believed to be unconstitutional by coalition members and Solano County leaders.

“More than twenty years ago Solano County leaders recognized that this ordinance restricting movement of waste across county lines is illegal under federal law, and the coalition is seeking to secure a court ruling to put this issue to rest,” said Ron Mittelstaedt, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of Waste Connections, Inc. “Measure E threatens the future of safe, efficient and environmentally sound management of regional municipal solid waste. The consequences for Solano County taxpayers could include an annual loss of over $3,000,000 to fund vital local services such as public safety, local road maintenance and environmental compliance,” Mittelstaedt concluded.

The coalition`s complaint, filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California in Sacramento, challenges as unconstitutional the 1984 measure that imposed an annual cap of 95,000 tons – a small fraction of current waste volumes – on the amount of solid waste that may enter Solano County from other jurisdictions for landfill disposal. The initiative, known as “Measure E,” was approved by Solano County voters nearly twenty-five years ago in the November 6, 1984 election.

Solano County has never enforced Measure E, and issued a memorandum concluding that the 1984 initiative is unconstitutional under United States Supreme Court precedent. Measure E discriminates against out-of-county waste, in violation of the United States Constitution`s protection of free movement of interstate commerce. Measure E does not impose limits on the disposal of in-county waste at Solano County landfills. The Legislative Counsel of California reached the same conclusion, writing in a 1992 Opinion that “Measure E, adopted by the voters of
Solano County, violates the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution.”

The coalition points in particular to the potential impacts of Measure E on the Potrero Hills Landfill, which is vital to satisfying the Bay Area`s solid waste disposal needs. If Measure E is enforced, communities across Northern California will pay much higher prices for waste disposal as they search for alternative sites across California and in neighboring states, according to the coalition`s Complaint. Measure E also undercuts a federal court order that the U.S.

Department of Justice and California Attorney General Jerry Brown obtained earlier this year directing that the Potrero Hills Landfill be sold to maintain competition in the solid waste industry in Northern California.

The coalition is filing suit in Federal court to ratify the County`s longstanding belief in the unconstitutionality of Measure E in response to
special interest groups and local activists seeking to compel enforcement of Measure E in order to drastically limit the Landfill`s capacity.

Mittelstaedt added that “Northern California`s waste hauling companies stand united in taking legal action to protect our customers, who have long depended on the unfettered movement of waste across county and state lines. No county is an island and we must all work together to allow waste to move freely to efficient, state of the art, and environmentally sound landfills such as Potrero Hills.”

The coalition members bringing suit represent much of the waste hauling and recycling industry in Northern California, including Potrero Hills Landfill, BLT Enterprises of Sacramento, Brentwood Disposal Service, Concord Disposal Service, Contra Costa Waste Service, Discovery Bay Disposal, El Dorado Disposal Service, Novato Disposal Service, Oakley Disposal Service, Pacific Coast Disposal Corporation, Pittsburg Disposal and Debris Box Service, Redwood Empire Disposal, Rio Vista Sanitation Service, Rohnert Park Disposal, Santa Rosa Recycling and Collection, Sunrise Garbage Service, Timber Cove Recycling, Waste Connections, West Sonoma County Disposal Service, West Sonoma County Transfer and Windsor Refuse and Recycling.

Sources: Waste Connections, Solano County, California, and WIH Resource Group

If you have any questions about this news or general questions about our diversified services, please contact Bob Wallace, Principal & VP of Client Solutions at WIH Resource Group and Waste Savings, Inc. at admin@wihrg.com

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